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17

Commonplaces and Arguments from Form

Lecture no. 17 from the course: Argumentation: The Study of Effective Reasoning

 Commonplaces and Arguments from Form

Taught by Professor David Zarefsky | 30 min | Categories: The Great Courses Plus Online Philosophy & Religion Courses

This lecture considers inferences based on social knowledge and inferences that resemble deductions but are not. Commonplaces are beliefs or judgments that an audience generally accepts as being true. Often these come in pairs of seemingly opposed terms with each term sometimes being preferred. Dilemmas, arguments from hypothesis, and arguments from probabilities are examples of inferences that are not deductive but gain their power from a form that resembles deduction.

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July 9, 2016

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