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4

Odysseus

Lecture no. 4 from the course: Famous Greeks

Odysseus

Taught by Professor J. Rufus Fears | 30 min | Categories: The Great Courses Plus Online History Courses

Unlike the doomed Hector, Agamemnon, and Achilles, the wily Odysseus is the consummate survivor. For 10 years after the fall of Troy, angry gods make him wander the Mediterranean. In the end, his prudence and courage restore him to his home. Homer makes Odysseus's story into a metaphor for the human experience, and gives us a look at the late Bronze Age.

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r********m
March 18, 2018
Course Guidebook: VI. For the last two hundred years, scholars have debated the “Homeric Question”: Who was Homer? Did a single great poet compose the Iliad and the Odyssey? How were the poems composed? Even the Greeks of the classical period lacked reliable information about Homer. A. The general scholarly consensus is that the Iliad was composed around 750 B.C. and the Odyssey, around 725 B.C. B. It is the doctrine of this course that both were composed by a single great creative genius, Homer. This "doctrine" remark is about as convincing as the remarks about Heinrich Schliemann in lecture #3

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d********m
December 29, 2017

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s********m
May 26, 2017

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