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19

Gnosticism and Judaism

Lecture no. 19 from the course: Gnosticism: From Nag Hammadi to the Gospel of Judas

Gnosticism and Judaism

Taught by Professor David Brakke | 32 min | Categories: The Great Courses Plus Online Philosophy & Religion Courses

Begin to investigate the significance of Gnosticism for religions other than Christianity. Look into why some historians believe that Gnosticism began as a Jewish religious movement and only later included Jesus, as well as the arguments against this view, in grasping how emerging Judaism was part of the story of Gnosticism.

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d********m
April 12, 2017

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b********t
May 25, 2016

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j********m
April 17, 2016
This course is excellent and the professor is very knowledgeable, but I have a problem with his description of Philo's philosophy. "The Lord" in the Bible is a translation of the Hebrew word "Adonai," which does not actually appear in the Torah as a name for God, but rather is a stand in for the unspoken name, YHWH. YWHW is the third person version of "I Am That I Am" and essentially means "The One Eternal Being" (which is reiterated in verses like that of the Shmah: "Hear O Israel, YHWH is our God, YHWH is One"). Having read Philo, I personally have not encountered this dissociation of YHWH with The One, but rather it seems that his terminology is a direct reference to this Biblical name for God, independent of Philo's description of God as a sort of metaphorical trinity. Also I find it a little disturbing or puzzling that he repeatedly refers to Israel as "Palestine" even during the periods when it was called Yahud or Judea (under the Babylonians, Persians, and Romans). He mentions the renaming of Jerusalem, but not the renaming of Judea to Syria-Palestine around 135 CE.

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