High School History

Taught By Multiple Professors
HS - Hammurabi and the Earliest Written Laws
1: HS - Hammurabi and the Earliest Written Laws

Why do we need laws? Professor of Humanistic Studies and History at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, Gregory S. Aldrete walks you through our earliest examples of law codes that made city-living possible....

2 min
HS - The Birth of Democracy
2: HS - The Birth of Democracy

Cleisthenes is credited with setting up the first democracy by creating a council of 500 to make political decisions based on their location. Dr. Gregory S. Aldrete, the Professor of Humanistic Studies and History at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay reveals how the original democracy was founded and structured, and how it grew into what we consider democracy today....

3 min
HS - The Legacy of Rome
3: HS - The Legacy of Rome

Join Professor of Humanistic Studies and History at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, Dr. Gregory S. Aldrete, as he provides a lively, animated overview of Rome's influences on our world—from our civics to our calendars....

2 min
HS - Expanding Voting Rights in the U.S.
4: HS - Expanding Voting Rights in the U.S.

Democracy—as we know it today—has shifted and evolved over the centuries. History professor Edward O'Donnell at College of the Holy Cross provides an illustrated view of what the origins of democracy in America looked like, and how they directly impacted the Westward expansion....

2 min
HS - The Lewis and Clark Expedition
5: HS - The Lewis and Clark Expedition

With dreams of expanding our country, Thomas Jefferson raised $2500, found and trained willing explorers, and kicked off an expedition that—literally—changed the shape of America. Dr. Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius, Professor of History at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, provides a vibrant look at this vital period in our history....

6 min
Gregory S. Aldrete

As an ancient historian, my goals are to share the enthusiasm for and fascination with antiquity that I feel, and to show some of the connections between that world and our own.

ALMA MATER

University of Michigan

INSTITUTION

University of Wisconsin, Green Bay

About Gregory S. Aldrete

Dr. Gregory S. Aldrete is Professor of Humanistic Studies and History at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, where he has taught since 1995. He earned his B.A. from Princeton University and his master's degree and Ph.D. in Ancient History from the University of Michigan. Honored many times over for his research and his teaching, Professor Aldrete was named by his university as the winner of its highest awards in each category, receiving both its Founders Association Award for Excellence in Scholarship and its Founders Association Award for Excellence in Teaching. That recognition of his teaching skills was echoed on a national level in 2009, when he received the American Philological Association Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Classics at the College Level-the national teaching award given annually by the professional association of classics professors. The recipient of many prestigious research fellowships including five from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Professor Aldrete has published several important books in his field, including Gestures and Acclamations in Ancient Rome; Floods of the Tiber in Ancient Rome; Daily Life in the Roman City: Rome, Pompeii, and Ostia; The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Daily Life I: The Ancient World (as editor); Unraveling the Linothorax Mystery: Reconstructing and Testing Ancient Linen Body Armor (with S. Bartell and A. Aldrete) and The Long Shadow of Antiquity: What Have the Greeks and Romans Done for Us (with A. Aldrete).

Also By This Professor

Edward T. O'Donnell

One central idea I try to communicate in my courses is that history is the study of choices. It follows no predetermined script. History is determined by the choices made by people both famous and unknown.

ALMA MATER

Columbia University

INSTITUTION

College of the Holy Cross

About Edward T. O'Donnell

Dr. Edward T. O'Donnell is Associate Professor of History at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. He earned his Ph.D. in American History from Columbia University. Since 2002 Professor O'Donnell has worked extensively with the federal U.S. Department of Education program Teaching American History. He has served as the lead historian for several grants and has led hundreds of workshops and seminars and delivered multimedia lectures designed to help teachers devise innovative methods for teaching American history. Active in the field of public history, Professor O'Donnell has curated major museum exhibits on American history and has appeared in several historical documentaries. He has also provided historical commentary and insight for The History Channel, ABC, PBS, the BBC, and the Discovery Channel. A popular public speaker, he has delivered more than 100 invited talks and conducted more than 2,000 walking tours of various historical American neighborhoods. Professor O'Donnell is the author and coauthor of several works dealing with a broad range of American history, including Visions of America: A History of the United States and 1001 Things Everyone Should Know about Irish American History.

Also By This Professor

Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius

Modernity is a notoriously slippery concept, because, obviously, what is modern now will soon become the past, as time marches relentlessly forward.

ALMA MATER

University of Pennsylvania

INSTITUTION

University of Tennessee

About Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius

Dr. Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius is Lindsay Young Professor of History and Director of the Center for the Study of War and Society at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He earned his B.A. from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. After receiving his doctorate, Dr. Liulevicius served as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace at Stanford University. Professor Liulevicius has won many awards and honors, including the University of Tennessee's Excellence in Teaching Award and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship. At the university he teaches courses on modern German history, Western civilization, European diplomatic history, Nazi Germany, World War I, war and culture, 20th-century Europe, nationalism, and utopian thought. Dr. Liulevicius has published numerous articles and two books: War Land on the Eastern Front: Culture, National Identity, and German Occupation in World War I and The German Myth of the East, 1800 to the Present.

Professor Liulevicius participated in The Great Courses Professor Chat series. Read the chat to learn more about diplomacy and war

Also By This Professor