High School Science

Taught By Multiple Professors
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HS - Why Are Leaves Green?
1: HS - Why Are Leaves Green?

Dr. Catherine Kleier, Professor of Biology at Regis University in Denver, Colorado explains why leaves are green, what photosynthesis is, and provides an overview of the anatomy of a leaf.   With accessible explanations and helpful illustrations, this lesson introduces concepts of biology and botany in a fun new way....

2 min
HS - Fossils: True Origins and Strange Stories
2: HS - Fossils: True Origins and Strange Stories

What are fossils? What conclusions about our past have fossils contributed to? Some of our ancestors had some radical and shocking ideas of what fossils were and the lessons they brought. Dr. Stuart Sutherland, Professor in the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at The University of British Columbia, takes an in-depth look at what history got right—and wrong—about fossils....

4 min
HS - How Far Away Is that Storm
3: HS - How Far Away Is that Storm

When you see lightning and then hear thunder, you might know to count in-between in order to gauge the distance of the storm. Eric R. Snodgrass, Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, explains how you calculate the speed of light and sound to determine how far away a storm is....

1 min
HS - Looking Up at the Moon
4: HS - Looking Up at the Moon

If you've ever thought the rising moon appeared bigger than it does when it is fully risen in the sky, you won't want to miss Dr. Edward M. Murphy, Associate Professor at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, debunk this common optical illusion with a hands-on exercise you can try at home....

1 min
HS - The Size of Our Solar System
5: HS - The Size of Our Solar System

Take an interactive and animated look at our solar system as Dr. Joshua N. Winn, Professor of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University, shrinks the sun to "human" size and then walks you through the entire solar system from that perspective, illuminating fascinating facts about each planet along the way....

8 min
HS - Saturn: Rings of Enchantment
6: HS - Saturn: Rings of Enchantment

What in the world are the rings of Saturn made of? Join Dr. David M. Meyer, Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Northwestern University, as he takes you out of this world to get up close and personal with Saturn. The rich graphics and robust images make you feel like you're visiting the ringed planet in person—although you'll also learn why you shouldn't do that....

3 min
HS - How to Easily Memorize the Multiplication Table
7: HS - How to Easily Memorize the Multiplication Table

Ever struggle with the multiplication table? Join Arthur Benjamin, Professor of Mathematics at Harvey Mudd College and expert "mathemagician" to gain quick and easy techniques that help you master over half of the multiplication table in no time at all. His enthusiasm and helpful tips make math fun for everyone....

4 min
Arthur T. Benjamin

As a professor, I have always wanted to bring math to the masses. The Great Courses has helped make that dream come true.

ALMA MATER

Johns Hopkins University

INSTITUTION

Harvey Mudd College

About Arthur T. Benjamin

Dr. Arthur T. Benjamin is Professor of Mathematics at Harvey Mudd College. He earned a Ph.D. in Mathematical Sciences from Johns Hopkins University in 1989. Professor Benjamin's teaching has been honored repeatedly by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA). In 2000, he received the MAA Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo National Award for Distinguished College or University Teaching of Mathematics. The MAA also named Professor Benjamin the 2006-2008 George Pólya Lecturer. In 2012, Princeton Review profiled him in The Best 300 Professors. He is a professional magician, whose techniques are explained in his book Secrets of Mental Math: The Mathemagician's Guide to Lightning Calculation and Amazing Math Tricks. Professor Benjamin also served for five years as coeditor of Math Horizons magazine. An avid games player, Dr. Benjamin is a past winner of the American Backgammon Tour and has written more than 15 papers on the mathematics of games and puzzles. Professor Benjamin has appeared on dozens of television and radio programs and has been featured in publications, including Scientific American, People, and The New York Times. In 2005, Reader's Digest called him America's Best Math Whiz.

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Edward M. Murphy

My goal is to introduce you to the beauty and the wonder of the night sky, and to give you a basic knowledge needed to feel more comfortable navigating the sky.

ALMA MATER

University of Virginia

INSTITUTION

University of Virginia

About Edward M. Murphy

Dr. Edward M. Murphy is Associate Professor, General Faculty at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. He earned his bachelor's degree in Astronomy from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and his Ph.D. in Astronomy from the University of Virginia in 1996. Professor Murphy was a postdoctoral fellow and an associate research scientist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, where he worked on NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). In 2000 he joined the faculty at the University of Virginia, where he continues to use FUSE, along with radio telescopes, in his research on the interstellar medium. Professor Murphy teaches courses on introductory astronomy and intelligent life in the universe to undergraduates, as well as seminars on how to teach astronomy to graduate students. He also offers evening classes for the local community at the historical Leander McCormick Observatory. He was named a Teaching and Technology Fellow in 2002-2003 and an Ernest Boots Mead Honored Faculty Fellow in 2003-2004. Dr. Murphy gives astronomy talks, appears regularly on local radio, and leads professional development workshops for teachers. He has also worked with the Science Museum of Virginia to develop planetarium shows and exhibits.

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Stuart Sutherland

I love investigating life's story and how major geological events have colored that story. I am also passionate about helping people 'read the rocks' so they can peel back the pages of Earth's history for themselves.

ALMA MATER

University of Leicester

INSTITUTION

The University of British Columbia

About Stuart Sutherland

Dr. Stuart Sutherland is a Professor in the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at The University of British Columbia (UBC). Raised in the United Kingdom, he earned an undergraduate degree in geology from the University of Plymouth and a Ph.D. in Geological Sciences from the University of Leicester for his studies on Silurian microfossils called chitinozoa. Professor Sutherland discovered his passion for teaching during an appointment at Brunel University in London. He went on to postdoctoral research at the Natural History Museum in London, working with other paleontologists to understand the Devonian organic-walled microfossils of the Cantabrian Mountains of northern Spain. During this time, he completed a postgraduate teaching degree at Sheffield Hallam University. Since 2000, Professor Sutherland has been on the faculty at UBC's Vancouver campus, where his interests center on Earth history and paleontology. He is a three-time winner of the UBC Earth and Ocean Sciences Teaching Award. He also received the Faculty of Science Teaching Award and the Killam Teaching Prize, and he was named a "popular professor" in two editions of Maclean's Guide to Canadian Universities.

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Catherine Kleier

Wherever we look, I think we can be surprised at what's out there in the plant kingdom.

ALMA MATER

University of California, Los Angeles

INSTITUTION

Regis University

About Catherine Kleier

Dr. Catherine Kleier is a Professor of Biology and former chair of the Department of Biology at Regis University in Denver, Colorado. Professor Kleier holds a Ph.D. in Organismic Biology, Ecology, and Evolution from the University of California, Los Angeles. She also holds an M.S. in General Science with an emphasis in botany and plant pathology from Oregon State University and a B.A. in Ecology, Population, and Organismic Biology from the University of Colorado Boulder.

The recipient of numerous honors and awards, Dr. Kleier was named Colorado Professor of the Year in 2015 by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. In 2014, she was elected Faculty Lecturer of the Year at Regis University. In previous years, she was selected as a scholar for the Aspen Institute's Aspen Environment Forum and was a Visiting Fulbright Scholar at the University of Otago in New Zealand.

Professor Kleier teaches courses in plant physiology, ecology, and environmental science. Her current research includes long-term restoration ecology on trails in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, plant impacts from skiing, and urban ecology. Her laboratory work has focused on the effect of magnesium chloride on the growth and reproduction of plants.

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David M. Meyer

I have found no better way to communicate the joy of discovery in astronomy than through the beautiful cosmic images obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope.

ALMA MATER

University of California, Los Angeles

INSTITUTION

Northwestern University

About David M. Meyer

Dr. David M. Meyer is Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Northwestern University, where he is also Director of the Dearborn Observatory and Co-Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics. He earned his B.S. in Astrophysics from the University of Wisconsin, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Astronomy from the University of California, Los Angeles. He continued his studies as a Robert R. McCormick Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Chicago's Enrico Fermi Institute before joining the Northwestern faculty. Professor Meyer's research focuses on the spectroscopic study of interstellar and extragalactic gas clouds-work carried out over the past 15 years with the help of the Hubble Space Telescope. Along with his collaborators, Professor Meyer has conducted 20 research projects with Hubble, resulting in 25 peer-reviewed publications. He has also served five times on the committee that annually selects the most deserving proposals for Hubble observing time. During his career at Northwestern, Professor Meyer has specialized in designing and teaching introductory undergraduate courses in astronomy, cosmology, and astro-biology for non-science majors. His many teaching awards include the Charles Deering McCormick Professorship of Teaching Excellence, Northwestern's highest teaching honor. Beyond campus, Professor Meyer has delivered popular talks on Hubble to young and old in settings as far-flung as a transatlantic crossing.

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Eric R Snodgrass

The science of extreme weather is one of the great triumphs of our time. And I would like everyone to understand how we got here and how to benefit from these advances in case of emergencies.

ALMA MATER

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

INSTITUTION

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

About Eric R Snodgrass

Eric R. Snodgrass is the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he also received his master's degree. Previously, he earned his bachelor's degree in Geography from Western Illinois University. Each year, Professor Snodgrass guides more than 1,500 University of Illinois students through the wild side of weather in his popular course Severe and Hazardous Weather. He also teaches General Physical Meteorology, Meteorological Instrumentation, and Economics of Weather, and he advises all undergraduate majors and minors in the department, widely recognized as one of the best meteorology programs in the nation. Professor Snodgrass's research initiatives focus on K-12 science education as well as weather forecasting applications in financial markets. He is a cofounder of Global Weather and Climate Logistics, a private company that advises weather-sensitive financial institutions. His company merged with Agrible, a precision farm management and predictive analytics company, where he is also a cofounder and principal atmospheric scientist. At the University of Illinois, Professor Snodgrass has received the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and the Campus Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. In addition, his online version of Severe and Hazardous Weather was named the best online course of 2012 by the University Professional and Continuing Education Association. His current research deals with weather risk involving landfalling tropical cyclones and global agricultural yield projections.

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Joshua N. Winn

There are so many reasons to study exoplanets, including exploration, the search for life, the rich physics problem of planet formation, and the technological challenge.

ALMA MATER

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

INSTITUTION

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

About Joshua N. Winn

Dr. Joshua N. Winn is the Professor of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University. After earning his Ph.D. in Physics from MIT, he held fellowships from the National Science Foundation and NASA at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Dr. Winn's research goals are to explore the properties of planets around other stars, understand how planets form and evolve, and make progress on the age-old question of whether there are other planets capable of supporting life. He was a member of the science team of NASA's Kepler mission and is the Deputy Science Director of a future NASA mission called the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. He has authored or coauthored more than 100 scientific articles on the subject of exoplanetary science. At MIT, Dr. Winn teaches physics and astronomy and has won several awards for his dedication to his students, including the Buechner Faculty Teaching Prize in 2008 and the School of Science Prize for Excellence in Graduate Teaching in 2013. His talent for communicating science to the general public was honed during graduate school, when he wrote for the science section of The Economist.

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