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The Earliest Explorers

Lecture no. 1 from the course: History's Greatest Voyages of Exploration

The Earliest Explorers

Taught by Professor Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius | 32 min | Categories: The Great Courses Plus Online History Courses

Begin your study journey with the Vivaldi brothers’ ill-fated journey to India. What drove the brothers—or drives any explorer—to take a risk and venture into the unknown? Consider that question as you look at theories on how the Pacific islands became populated starting with an epic movement 7,000 years ago.

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p********m
October 18, 2017
Humans spread from Ararat after the Global Flood around 4000 BC, NOT from Africa. The location of ‘Eden’ is unknown – although certainly NOT Africa – because global topography was radically altered during and after the Global Flood. The Bible is the most reliable historical document in existence, whereas archaeological artefacts depend heavily on human interpretation, and fossils say nothing without imaginative human interpretation. However, both artefacts and fossils are entirely consistent with the Biblical accounts. Some Polynesians also had a physical star map. The foods which Polynesians relied on were (and still are) what we now call ‘super foods’; such that Bligh’s ill-fated journey to Tonga was funded specifically to collect bread fruit for the English. For those who want more detail on the Pacific, I recommend the book: “Explorers of the Pacific” by Geoffrey Badger. The recent film, ‘Kontiki,’ about Heyerdahl was also very good. Heyerdahl’s Kontiki replica - pictured in the lecture - is the dominant artefact in an excellent museum in Ballina, NSW, Australia.

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g********m
September 14, 2017

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k********m
June 17, 2017

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