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4

Radiation and the Greenhouse Effect

Lecture no. 4 from the course: Meteorology: An Introduction to the Wonders of the Weather

Radiation and the Greenhouse Effect

Taught by Professor Robert G. Fovell | 29 min | Categories: The Great Courses Plus Online Science Course

Energy radiates all around us, streaming in from sunbeams and emanating from every object on Earth. Investigate the various kinds of radiation represented on the electromagnetic spectrum, and see how these forms of energy—assisted by the greenhouse effect—make life possible on our planet.

Reviews

p********m
October 13, 2017
+++++ Very intelligent, carefully crafted script. I love the graph and explanation of solar radiation vs wavelength, and Wien’s law. Very logical timing & emphasis on absorption, and very well explained; especially the atmospheric absorption graph. ‘Sunburn alley’ is a very pragmatic and instructive phrase, so why discourage students from using it? Significant observation: “The atmosphere absorbs best, what the sun makes the least of.” This explains why the majority of the sun’s heat passes through the atmosphere to warm the earth’s surface. The greenhouse blanket analogy and diagram works well for me. Surely, we should be more concerned about global cooling, instead of global warming?! Why is only one tertiary colour included in ROYGBIV? Indigo is a tertiary colour, so the rainbow (spectrum) really only has 3 primary colours (red, yellow, blue) and 3 secondary colours (orange, green, violet), unless we list all the other tertiary colours as well. It’s NOT because the spectrum is divided into seven equal lengths, because spectral length is used in spectroscopy to deduce all kinds of information. Also, the spectrum shown in this lecture has light & dark blue which the presenter calls blue & indigo, and that’s an additional confusion to a topic which has annoyed me greatly ever since I was first required to memorise ROYGBIV for a science test, and told that I’m ‘wrong’ if I don’t include indigo.

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t********g
September 30, 2015

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