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6

Going in Circles

Lecture no. 6 from the course: Physics and Our Universe

Going in Circles

Taught by Professor Richard Wolfson | 29 min | Categories: The Great Courses Plus Online Science Course

Circular motion is accelerated motion, even if the speed is constant, because the direction, and hence the velocity, is changing. Analyze cases of uniform and non-uniform circular motion. Then close with a problem challenging you to pull out of a dive in a jet plane without blacking out or crashing.

60 Lectures

1
Image of The Fundamental Science
The Fundamental Science
0 of 30 min
2
Image of Languages of Physics
Languages of Physics
0 of 31 min
3
Image of Describing Motion
Describing Motion
0 of 28 min
4
Image of Falling Freely
Falling Freely
0 of 30 min
5
Image of It's a 3-D World!
It's a 3-D World!
0 of 28 min
6
Image of Going in Circles
Going in Circles
0 of 29 min
7
Image of Causes of Motion
Causes of Motion
0 of 30 min
8
Image of Using Newton's Laws—1-D motion
Using Newton's Laws—1-D motion
0 of 31 min
9
Image of Action and Reaction
Action and Reaction
0 of 29 min
10
Image of Newton's Laws in 2 and 3 Dimensions
Newton's Laws in 2 and 3 Dimensions
0 of 29 min
11
Image of Work and Energy
Work and Energy
0 of 30 min
12
Image of Using Energy Conservation
Using Energy Conservation
0 of 29 min
13
Image of Gravity
Gravity
0 of 30 min
14
Image of Systems of Particles
Systems of Particles
0 of 30 min
15
Image of Rotational Motion
Rotational Motion
0 of 33 min
16
Image of Keeping Still
Keeping Still
0 of 30 min
17
Image of Back and Forth—Oscillatory Motion
Back and Forth—Oscillatory Motion
0 of 31 min
18
Image of Making Waves
Making Waves
0 of 28 min
19
Image of Fluid Statics—The Tip of the Iceberg
Fluid Statics—The Tip of the Iceberg
0 of 30 min
20
Image of Fluid Dynamics
Fluid Dynamics
0 of 30 min
21
Image of Heat and Temperature
Heat and Temperature
0 of 29 min
22
Image of Heat Transfer
Heat Transfer
0 of 30 min
23
Image of Matter and Heat
Matter and Heat
0 of 30 min
24
Image of The Ideal Gas
The Ideal Gas
0 of 30 min
25
Image of Heat and Work
Heat and Work
0 of 30 min
26
Image of Entropy—The Second Law of Thermodynamics
Entropy—The Second Law of Thermodynamics
0 of 30 min
27
Image of Consequences of the Second Law
Consequences of the Second Law
0 of 30 min
28
Image of A Charged World
A Charged World
0 of 31 min
29
Image of The Electric Field
The Electric Field
0 of 30 min
30
Image of Electric Potential
Electric Potential
0 of 30 min
31
Image of Electric Energy
Electric Energy
0 of 28 min
32
Image of Electric Current
Electric Current
0 of 30 min
33
Image of Electric Circuits
Electric Circuits
0 of 30 min
34
Image of Magnetism
Magnetism
0 of 29 min
35
Image of The Origin of Magnetism
The Origin of Magnetism
0 of 30 min
36
Image of Electromagnetic Induction
Electromagnetic Induction
0 of 31 min
37
Image of Applications of Electromagnetic Induction
Applications of Electromagnetic Induction
0 of 28 min
38
Image of Magnetic Energy
Magnetic Energy
0 of 30 min
39
Image of AC/DC
AC/DC
0 of 30 min
40
Image of Electromagnetic Waves
Electromagnetic Waves
0 of 30 min
41
Image of Reflection and Refraction
Reflection and Refraction
0 of 31 min
42
Image of Imaging
Imaging
0 of 29 min
43
Image of Wave Optics
Wave Optics
0 of 32 min
44
Image of Cracks in the Classical Picture
Cracks in the Classical Picture
0 of 29 min
45
Image of Earth, Ether, Light
Earth, Ether, Light
0 of 30 min
46
Image of Special Relativity
Special Relativity
0 of 30 min
47
Image of Time and Space
Time and Space
0 of 31 min
48
Image of Space-Time and Mass-Energy
Space-Time and Mass-Energy
0 of 31 min
49
Image of General Relativity
General Relativity
0 of 30 min
50
Image of Introducing the Quantum
Introducing the Quantum
0 of 30 min
51
Image of Atomic Quandaries
Atomic Quandaries
0 of 31 min
52
Image of Wave or Particle?
Wave or Particle?
0 of 31 min
53
Image of Quantum Mechanics
Quantum Mechanics
0 of 31 min
54
Image of Atoms
Atoms
0 of 31 min
55
Image of Molecules and Solids
Molecules and Solids
0 of 30 min
56
Image of The Atomic Nucleus
The Atomic Nucleus
0 of 30 min
57
Image of Energy from the Nucleus
Energy from the Nucleus
0 of 31 min
58
Image of The Particle Zoo
The Particle Zoo
0 of 30 min
59
Image of An Evolving Universe
An Evolving Universe
0 of 30 min
60
Image of Humble Physics—What We Don't Know
Humble Physics—What We Don't Know
0 of 31 min

Reviews

j********m
November 18, 2016
This professor is great. So fun and engaging! And I love that he talks in his normal voice, rather than some of the other professors The Great Courses which talk in a slow monotone that puts you to sleep.

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t********e
September 8, 2016

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j********m
June 8, 2016
Just to preface my review, I hold a bachelor’s degree with a double major in Physics and Mathematics, I tutored and lab assisted courses in both disciplines while attending college and I have worked as an engineer. I’ve studied and applied these topics and the mathematics behind them for literally thousands of hours; this by no means makes me an expert, but should serve to underscore the points below. The content is very good and most everything that you would see in General Physics I, II, and III at a university is covered in these lectures; I would recommend this series for someone who is considering entering into physics as a major or minor, or who need a heads up before taking general physics as an elective. The course serves as a ‘sampler’ of the basic concepts and fields of physics. The only complaint that I have with this series is the brisk pace at which the material is presented; it is not for the faint of heart and a second viewing of each lecture will likely be required for those without a background. If you want to get anything more than a taste of what physics is about from this series, obtaining an external textbook with solved problems is probably a good idea. I would recommend that you first read and understand the related material in the guidebook for this course, watch the lecture, go through the related sections in your alternate text book (including the problem sets or examples in your text), then watch the lecture again. This isn’t topic that can be absorbed purely by osmosis, you need to work problems (a lot of problems) to internalize the material while moving forward. If you start a lecture without having fully learned the last lectures material, you will soon end up lost and/or frustrated. If the rate of speech and the introduction of concepts in these lectures feel like one or two 60 minute lectures have been squeezed into a 30 minute lecture, don’t be alarmed. Keep in mind that the topics covered here are generally presented over the course of 2-3 semesters of a course that meets 3 times a week, 50 minutes each time, for 16 weeks; that’s 96-144 class room lectures of approximately twice the duration of each video. In essence, 96 to 144 classroom lectures have been condensed down to roughly 30 hours. Don’t feel discouraged if you have to watch these lectures three times each to hold onto the info. In my opinion, this series ought to have been broken into three series of 36 lectures each like the Calculus courses from The Great Courses have been. This is how the topic is generally treated in a university setting (General Physics I, II, and III) and there is a reason for that.

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