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Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science

Get a grip on reality in 36 enthralling lectures about the changing view of what’s real—in space, in matter, in society, and in your brain.

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Reviews

b********m
September 14, 2019
If you are planning on watching every single corse in Great Courses Plus then you need to leave this for the very last one. This brilliantly structured class is the ultimate summary of physics, metaphysics, sociology, behavioral economics, science, theology, history, pop culture, politics, logic, reasoning, and, of course, philosophy. I love it.

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p********m
June 18, 2019
I really enjoyed this course. It's a good blend of the science as we know it and the philisophical underpinnings that are the axioms to the science. I think a lot of people forget how much the science depends on the philosophy and assume that science doesn't need any philosophy. My only quibble for this course would be on certain specifics on things I know a little bit more about than a layman. When he talks about the Bell Curve, it's seems like Dr Gimbel didn't really read the book and relies on what others have said about it. Dr. Gimbel's account didn't really match my reading of the book. Also when Gimbel uses, I think it was, Envrionmental Working Groups Dirty Dozen in his lecture, I feel he missed the mark. Citing an activist group only makes the lecture a little less credible. I know what Dr Gimbel was trying to do, but since, as a chemist I know how the sausage is made, using EWG was bad, especially when Gimbel could have made the same point using a much more reputible source. That said, at the time this lecture was recorded, the dirty dealings of EWG might not have been as readily apperant as it is now. But to me that just underscores the point that citing activists now can hurt credibilty later. Minor quibbles in an otherwise very very good course. I highly recommend this course to everyone with an interest in science and philosophy.

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m********t
May 23, 2019
Dr. Gimbel is one of my favorite of your outstanding professors. I was fascinated by how often what we "think we know" turns out to be false, and came to appreciate the determination of scientists to search for the truth, regardless where it leads.

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