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3

Marshmallows, Monkeys, and Mortality

Lecture no. 3 from the course: Scientific Secrets for Self-Control

Marshmallows, Monkeys, and Mortality

Taught by Professor C. Nathan DeWall | 28 min | Categories: The Great Courses Plus Online Professional Development Courses

In this lecture, go inside the famous “marshmallow experiment” at Stanford University and its revelations about delayed gratification; learn how delaying gratification is important even for primates and dogs; and probe general differences in self-control and its effects on everything from mental health to wealth accumulation to an early death.

Reviews

j********m
March 13, 2019
Well designed lecture.

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r********m
February 2, 2019
This lecture is a highlight of the course as it shows how important self control is for many, many objective measures of positive outcomes in life. So I am quite astounded that it got so bad scores from some people. What's the problem? Of course I cannot know for sure, but knowing how the majority of people lets emotion influence their decisions, I can only suspect that some people just did not "like" the fact that self control is so important for life success. For you guys I have some bad news: Not only has the importance of self control been replicated in big recent studies, it has also been shown in a recent meta-study that high self control seems to be 60% heritable. And as it is so strongly related to IQ, I'd also suspect that those races that typically score low in IQ tests also have less self control, which may explain a good chunk of their (in average) worse performance in life (lower educational attainment, job performance, life expectancy, but higher crime and drug abuse rates for instance). You can find the meta-study from 11/2018 at https://psyarxiv.com/eaz3d/

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r********t
September 23, 2018

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