The Great Tours: England, Scotland, and Wales

Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Great Tours: England, Scotland, and Wales As usual the GREAT Courses live up to their name, very pleased with the content and presentation.
Date published: 2020-10-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fall and rise of China I found these lectures very informative, with very good historical and personal details. I also liked the format and style of the presenter. Most enjoyable and relevant for our times as China becomes real challenger.
Date published: 2020-09-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Highly enjoyable lecture series! I really enjoyed Dr. Allitt and the subject matter. The professor is personable and knowledgeable. Dr. Allitt's life experience added value to the subject matter. He also shared his opinions and sense of humor from time to time which kept the lectures from being too dry. I watched all 36 lectures!
Date published: 2020-09-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very interesting and informative Professor Allitt is a great teacher. Very engaging.
Date published: 2020-09-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from good content I enjoyed the background of areas I had visited not to mention knowing about those I'd never visited. What was not enjoyable was the lack of sync between audio and video... and the nasal accent of snide & biased opinions lent little joy.
Date published: 2020-09-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enjoyable and enthusatically presented This was not quite what I was expecting from a 'Great Tour'. It spent a lot of time reviewing architecture and almost nothing on culture and cuisine. I did enjoy the coverage of hiking trails although again, perhaps too much focus here. However, I watched the entire course and really came to enjoy professor Allit and his self-deprecating dry wit.
Date published: 2020-09-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A winner all around! My wife and I watched this one together, and we agree it’s one of the very best Teaching Company courses we’ve ever done. The topic is ideal for vicarious tourism during the pandemic, and doubly so for us having previously spent a year there. However, personal familiarity with the UK is by no means a requirement for greatly enjoying and learning from this course. Professor Allitt is one of the company’s superstars, and all the reasons for this are evident here. In addition to extensive professional knowledge of his subject, he brings the personal perspective of having grown up and been educated in England. Although the course includes plenty about London and other most often visited places around the country, his itinerary is carefully laid-out to include many less familiar and unusual places and features. There is a great deal of history, but also a continuous stream of literary references, interesting and unusual facts, and personal anecdotes, all presented not only with scholarly authority but also in a most enjoyable, avuncular manner. A definite winner all around!
Date published: 2020-09-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Great Tours: England, Scotland, and Wales Being of Scottish and British descent, I have visited England and Scotland several times. In fact, I wrote a book about one of the visits.... Glasgow to Heathrow by B&B and Car.... This course was so enjoyable! It was like revisiting some of the sites and cities. And full of new information about places that I haven't been to yet. I am looking forward to visiting Wales. I wasn't aware that there was so much there to see. So many aspects of the country were covered that we don't always hear about. It was fantastic. I look forward to the other courses that I have ordered.
Date published: 2020-09-17
  • y_2020, m_10, d_30, h_16
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvrr, vn_bulk_3.0.12
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_16, tr_189
  • loc_en_CA, sid_8006, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=SUBMISSION_TIME, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_teachco
  • bvseo_sdk, p_sdk, 3.2.1
  • CLOUD, getReviews, 4.09ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT
The Great Tours: England, Scotland, and Wales
Course Trailer
Welcome to Britain
1: Welcome to Britain

See why Great Britain offers so much as a travel destination. From thousand-year-old castles and cathedrals to contemporary art museums and scenic hikes, there is something for everyone. Begin your tour with a look at the scope of all Britain has to offer—and a few off-the-beaten-path ideas for getting to know England, Scotland, and Wales.

30 min
Prehistoric Britain
2: Prehistoric Britain

Great Britain’s history begins 5,000 years ago with a mysterious ancient people whose only vestiges are earthworks and stone circles like Stonehenge. Because of Stonehenge’s massive popularity, you may want to consider visiting other ancient ruins such as Avebury or Maiden Castle.

30 min
Roman Britain
3: Roman Britain

The next era in Britain’s history is the Roman conquest. In the first century B.C.E., the Romans invaded and spread their territory to the Anglo-Scottish border. There, Hadrian’s Wall marks the edge of the empire. Consider the Roman impact on Great Britain, from the city of Bath to the island’s long, straight roads.

29 min
Anglo-Saxon and Viking Britain
4: Anglo-Saxon and Viking Britain

After the Romans left Britain, a number of Germanic tribes stepped in to fill the power vacuum. With the help of the Venerable Bede and other contemporary sources, explore the Anglo-Saxon conquests. Then turn to the Viking attacks in the Middle Ages. Be sure to add Offa’s Dyke and the monastery of Lindisfarne to your travel itinerary.

31 min
Britain’s Medieval Castles
5: Britain’s Medieval Castles

Medieval castles and cathedrals are some of the most striking sites in all of Britain. Here, survey the development of castles built between 1066 and 1500. As you reflect on the evolution of the stone keep and outer wall, concentric design, and more, your tour takes you to such crowd-pleasers as Tower of London, Caerphilly in Wales, Dover Castle, and more.

29 min
Britain’s Medieval Cathedrals
6: Britain’s Medieval Cathedrals

Like the medieval castles, Britain’s cathedrals are astounding sites and an absolute must for any visitor to the island. Here, Professor Allitt explores the major milestones in cathedral architecture, from the Romanesque style of Durham Cathedral to the gothic style of Canterbury. He also takes you to the world-renowned Westminster Abbey.

31 min
Tudor Britain
7: Tudor Britain

From the end of the Wars of the Roses in 1485 to the Gunpowder Plot in 1605, Britain experienced severe political upheavals. Among other events, Henry VIII broke from the Catholic Church to found the Church of England. Witness how the era’s architecture—including Hampton Court Palace, Hardwick Hall, and Sulgrave Manor—reflected the political turmoil.

30 min
Magna Carta and Civil War
8: Magna Carta and Civil War

Continue your study of the political shifts during Renaissance Britain, a period when kings were gradually forced to share power with Parliament. This tension broke bounds in the 17th century, when Charles I, defeated in a civil war, was beheaded at the Banqueting House in London. After Oliver Cromwell’s quasi-military dictatorship, the crown was restored to Charles II—but political tension persisted.

29 min
Enlightenment Britain
9: Enlightenment Britain

Some of the greatest sites in Britain today are products of the Enlightenment. Delve into some of Christopher Wren’s architectural achievements, including the Royal Observatory and the splendid St. Paul’s Cathedral. Then move beyond London to explore the great country estates of Kedleston and Calke Abbey.

30 min
Industrial Britain
10: Industrial Britain

Britain was home to the Industrial Revolution, driven by advancements in textiles, coal mining, and iron. Tour the country to see some of the monuments to industry, including Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire, Coalbrookdale in Shropshire, and the Big Pit in the South Wales village of Blaenafon. Visit and travel on the nation’s canals and railways from the same era.

29 min
Victorian Britain
11: Victorian Britain

Victorian Britain is a fascinating architectural period, which witnessed a revival of many older styles, culminating in the Neo-Gothic. Visit such masterpieces of the Gothic Revival as Manchester Town Hall, St. Pancras Station in London, and the Museum of Natural History. Then tour Kensington, where the Royal Albert Hall commemorates Victoria’s husband.

31 min
Twentieth-Century Britain
12: Twentieth-Century Britain

Conclude your survey of British architecture with an overview of the 20th century—a period when, according to Professor Allitt, some of the nation’s worst buildings were constructed. The early part of the century saw striking achievements, such as Arts and Crafts style country houses, but the post-World War II era was an age of Brutalist concrete, from which we are only just escaping today.

30 min
Edinburgh and Glasgow
13: Edinburgh and Glasgow

Scottish nationalism is one of the more intriguing phenomena in today’s headlines. Here, look beyond the news reports to investigate Scotland’s two great cities: Edinburgh and Glasgow. While giving you a tour of the cities, Professor Allitt also introduces you to some of Scotland’s most famous figures, including Walter Scott, Adam Smith, and David Hume.

30 min
Wild Scotland: Beyond Edinburgh and Glasgow
14: Wild Scotland: Beyond Edinburgh and Glasgow

Continue your tour of Scotland with a look beyond the cities. You’ll visit the Scottish Highlands, which is the least densely populated part of Europe, and explore the great history of this wild land. Your investigation takes you to the tragic and beautiful valley of Glencoe; the Spey Valley, a mecca for Scotch whiskey lovers; and the beautiful Scottish islands.

29 min
North Wales
15: North Wales

Shift your attention to the other country within the nation. Beginning with Offa’s Dyke and touring a ring of castles—including the UNESCO World Heritage sites of Conwy Castle and Harlech—this tour of North Wales is an ideal introduction to the Welsh landscape, history, and heritage.

30 min
Cardiff and South Wales
16: Cardiff and South Wales

Head south to the capital city of Cardiff, where impressive civic buildings and the National Museum of Wales await you. The architecture of this city is magnificent, and offers much to see, from the polychromatic fantasy rooms of Cardiff Castle to the dome over the National Museum. Then turn to the South Wales towns of Tredegar and Swansea, home of Dylan Thomas.

29 min
The North of England
17: The North of England

England is a nation of regions, and the wild Pennine Hills in the north—Wuthering Heights country—is one of the must-see stops in your travels. Here, cities such as Liverpool, Manchester, and York were industrial dynamos in the 19th century—and the National Railway Museum in York is one of Professor Allitt’s top-rated destinations for visitors.

30 min
The English Midlands
18: The English Midlands

You might be tempted to skip the English Midlands, but if you have the time in your itinerary, the region has much to offer. Home to Josiah Wedgwood’s pottery, quaint villages, and Robin Hood’s Sherwood Forest, the Midlands have a fascinating heritage and offer an incomparable look into the British story.

30 min
East Anglia
19: East Anglia

Continue your survey of the great regions of England with a look East Anglia. A rural district that has inspired nature lovers and scientists for generations, East Anglia is also home to stately country houses such as Blickling and Houghton Hall and country towns like Norwich. This quiet region warrants at least a day’s visit.

29 min
England’s West Country
20: England’s West Country

Look now to the dramatic landscape of the West Country. The sleepy villages of Somerset and Dorset give way to the colorful towns of Devonshire and Cornwall, which has become a magnet for visual artists. The hilltop island church of St. Michael’s Mount and the ancient fortress of Tintagel should not be missed.

30 min
The Museums of London
21: The Museums of London

In this lecture, trade the calm of the country for the bustle of the city. Professor Allitt takes you to some of the world’s finest museums, including the British Museum, home to the controversial Elgin Marbles, once plundered from the Parthenon in Athens. You’ll also visit the Victoria and Albert Museum, the National Gallery, and the Tate Modern.

29 min
London’s Streets and Parks
22: London’s Streets and Parks

Learn how to navigate London by tube and foot. Go inside the underground stations and learn why the tube is the best way to get around the city. Above ground, discover the urban retreats of Regent’s Park and Hyde Park, and the shopping hub that is Regent Street. With so many museums, parks, and attractions, London has never been a more interesting and fun city to visit.

30 min
Buckingham Palace and Parliament
23: Buckingham Palace and Parliament

Buckingham Palace and the Houses of Parliament are two of the most popular tourist destinations, and they embody the government of Great Britain. See why these buildings are such a draw, learn about their architecture and renovations over the years, and reflect on the nature of Britain’s constitutional monarchy.

30 min
Oxford and Cambridge
24: Oxford and Cambridge

Step away from teeming London into the famous university towns of Oxford and Cambridge. Both house venerable academic institutions, each with its own distinct mood and atmosphere. Learn about some of the famous graduates from each university, and tour a sampling of their beautiful chapels, libraries, rivers, and gardens.

28 min
Literary Britain: Chaucer and Shakespeare
25: Literary Britain: Chaucer and Shakespeare

Great Britain is home to one of the world’s great literary traditions—and literature is a terrific way to frame your tour through the island. In this first of four literary lectures, reflect on the work of two of Britain’s most-prized poets, Chaucer and Shakespeare. Retrace the pilgrims’ path of The Canterbury Tales, visit Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre beside the River Thames, and more.

28 min
Literary Britain: The Romantics
26: Literary Britain: The Romantics

Continue your literary journey through Britain. From the great Scottish writers Walter Scott and Robert Burns to Wordsworth’s evocative descriptions of the Lake District, the Romantic writers of the 18th and 19th centuries created an enduring mood and style that still resonate today. Also tour the quiet villages where Jane Austen worked and the Jurassic coast at Lyme Regis.

29 min
Literary Britain: Poets and Novelists
27: Literary Britain: Poets and Novelists

Shelley, Keats, and Byron are three of the world’s finest poets, and their work is steeped in the history and landscape of Britain. Reflect on the land that inspired their finest works, and then turn to the world of the Brontë sisters in the North and Charles Dickens in the South, whose novels evoke not only the land but also the people of the 19th century.

29 min
Literary Britain: The 20th Century
28: Literary Britain: The 20th Century

Round out your study of British literature with a survey of the 20th-century masters. Check out the Baker Street of Sherlock Holmes, visit the rural Dorset villages of Thomas Hardy, and then pop over to Bloomsbury in London to see where Virginia Woolf and her comrades created a new kind of literature.

29 min
Artistic Britain: Painters and Sculptors
29: Artistic Britain: Painters and Sculptors

Britain has a distinguished artistic tradition along with a set of museums that house many of the world’s greatest visual masterpieces. Examine the lives and works of some of the great painters and sculptors, including William Hogarth, Joseph Turner, Thomas Gainsborough, Henry Moore, and Barbara Hepworth.

28 min
Britain’s Estates and Gardens
30: Britain’s Estates and Gardens

Because of its mild and wet climate, Britain is well suited for flowers, and England has a proud history of gardening going back to the 1500s. In this visually rich lecture, tour some of the most stunning gardens in the nation today, including the Botanic Garden at Oxford University; Kew Gardens in London; and others, grand and obscure, throughout the provinces.

30 min
Legacy of the British Empire
31: Legacy of the British Empire

From the 17th through the 20th century, Britain’s empire spanned the globe, giving this small island an outsized role on the world’s stage. But while Britain was making an impact in India, New Zealand, Canada, and elsewhere, these nations were having an impact on Britain. Explore the ethnic and cultural diversity in Britain today.

31 min
Seafaring Britain
32: Seafaring Britain

Britain became a world power thanks to its domination of the seas in the 18th and 19th centuries. Visit the historic dockyard in Portsmouth, where you can see some of the ships that helped put Britain on the map. Then discover some of the less well-known but equally impressive ports and ships, plus some of Britain’s many coastal lighthouses.

31 min
Britain’s War Memorials
33: Britain’s War Memorials

As a world power, Britain fought many wars—which it has commemorated in many ways. Among other memorials, this lecture takes you to Blenheim Place (commemorating the Duke of Marlborough’s defeat of a great French and Bavarian army in 1704) to Trafalgar Square in London (with its memorial to Horatio Nelson), to Hyde Park Corner (the best place to see war memorials in England), and the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior in Westminster Abbey.

29 min
Hiking England, Scotland, and Wales
34: Hiking England, Scotland, and Wales

While you need a car, train, or boat to get a comprehensive tour of Britain, arguably the best way to explore the nation is by foot. England, Scotland, and Wales are home to some of the best hiking paths in Europe, from the Lake District that inspired the Romantic poets to the Southwest Coast Path to the demanding Pennine Way trail up the spine of northern England.

29 min
Britain’s Sporting Tradition
35: Britain’s Sporting Tradition

Soccer, cricket, tennis, golf: These sports were invented in Britain and play a major role in the nation’s culture today. Whether you are a rabid Man United nut or occasionally enjoy a match at Wimbledon, Britain has something for every sports fan—and the timing of sporting events may be something to consider when planning your great tour.

31 min
How to Think about Visiting Britain
36: How to Think about Visiting Britain

Tourism is a good test of self-knowledge: Why do you want to travel in the first place? While Britain is an ideal place to travel, it behooves you to spend a few minutes reflecting on why you want to go there so that you plan the most meaningful trip. Professor Allitt ends with a few practical tips to help you get the most from your travels.

40 min
Patrick N. Allitt

Nostalgia is the enemy of history. 'Downton Abbey' is great fun but it's not history. If seeing or reading something historical makes you feel warm and cosy, it's probably very inaccurate.

ALMA MATER

University of California, Berkeley

INSTITUTION

Emory University

About Patrick N. Allitt

Dr. Patrick N. Allitt is Cahoon Family Professor of American History at Emory University, where he has taught since 1988. The holder of a doctorate in history from the University of California, Berkeley, Professor Allitt-an Oxford University graduate-has also taught American religious history at Harvard Divinity School, where he was a Henry Luce Postdoctoral Fellow. He was the Director of Emory College's Center for Teaching and Curriculum from 2004 to 2009, where he looked for ways to improve teaching. In this critical administrative position, he led workshops on a wide variety of teaching-related problems, visited dozens of other professors' classes, and provided one-on-one consultation to teachers to help them overcome particular pedagogical problems. Professor Allitt was honored with Emory's Excellence in Teaching Award and in 2000 was appointed to the N.E.H./Arthur Blank Professorship of Teaching in the Humanities. A widely published and award-winning author, Professor Allitt has written several books, including The Conservatives: Ideas and Personalities throughout American History; Catholic Intellectuals and Conservative Politics in America, 1950-1985; Catholic Converts: British and American Intellectuals Turn to Rome; and Religion in America since 1945: A History. He is also author of I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom, a memoir about one semester in his life as a university professor. In addition, he is the editor of Major Problems in American Religious History. He has written numerous articles and reviews for academic and popular journals, including The New York Times Book Review.

Also By This Professor