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11

1838—The British Slavery Abolition Act

Lecture no. 11 from the course: Turning Points in Modern History

1838—The British Slavery Abolition Act

Taught by Professor Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius | 30 min | Categories: The Great Courses Plus Online History Courses

Confront the harsh realities of the African slave trade and consider the role social mobilization played in eradicating the institution across the British Empire.

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a********m
February 23, 2017

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h********m
March 23, 2016

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e********u
September 23, 2015
The lecturer misleads viewers when he talks about the "middle" men in the slave trade. Its true that they were captives of war or indebeted somehow but he didnt mention how African slave trade was not chattel slavery. African middle men did not know their human trade was going into chattel slavery. In African slavery the system was more of indentured. In other words enslaved Africans could regain their freedom and their children were not born slaves unlike the system that European traders were conducting. Please clarify! Also Im not sure where the lecturer got his information about what captives were traded for but fabric was not the main thing (what use did Africans have for fabric they were making mud cloth and looming their own fabrics for centuries) What captives were being traded for was something like Pookah shells and guns in addition to fabric. Also the # of africans captured and enslaved is wrong. I think he said 18 million? In my guess Try 20-60 million but In American Holocaust (1992), David Stannard estimates that some 30 to 60 million Africans died being enslaved.

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