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36

Inventions and History

Lecture no. 36 from the course: Understanding the Inventions That Changed the World

Inventions and History

Taught by Professor W. Bernard Carlson | 31 min | Categories: The Great Courses Plus Online Science Course

What lessons can we learn about technological creativity from history? How does studying inventions change our understanding of history? As you wrap up your course, reflect on what you’ve learned about the material dimension of history, consider the nature of progress, and take away some key messages about how we can “use yesterday’s technology to solve tomorrow’s problems today.”

36 Lectures

1
Image of Great Inventions in Everyday Life
Great Inventions in Everyday Life
0 of 31 min
2
Image of The Potter’s Wheel and Metallurgy
The Potter’s Wheel and Metallurgy
0 of 33 min
3
Image of Beer, Wine, and Distilled Spirits
Beer, Wine, and Distilled Spirits
0 of 32 min
4
Image of The Galley, Coins, and the Alphabet
The Galley, Coins, and the Alphabet
0 of 26 min
5
Image of Crossbows East and West
Crossbows East and West
0 of 25 min
6
Image of Roman Arches—Aqueducts and the Colosseum
Roman Arches—Aqueducts and the Colosseum
0 of 28 min
7
Image of Waterwheels and Clocks
Waterwheels and Clocks
0 of 29 min
8
Image of Pagodas and Cathedrals
Pagodas and Cathedrals
0 of 30 min
9
Image of Paper and Printing
Paper and Printing
0 of 27 min
10
Image of Gunpowder, Cannons, and Guns
Gunpowder, Cannons, and Guns
0 of 25 min
11
Image of Telescopes and Microscopes
Telescopes and Microscopes
0 of 35 min
12
Image of The Caravel and Celestial Navigation
The Caravel and Celestial Navigation
0 of 37 min
13
Image of Unblocking the Power of Coal and Iron
Unblocking the Power of Coal and Iron
0 of 28 min
14
Image of Steam Engines and Pin Making
Steam Engines and Pin Making
0 of 28 min
15
Image of Canals and Railroads
Canals and Railroads
0 of 29 min
16
Image of Food Preservation
Food Preservation
0 of 28 min
17
Image of Water and Sewer Systems
Water and Sewer Systems
0 of 29 min
18
Image of Batteries and Electric Generators
Batteries and Electric Generators
0 of 27 min
19
Image of Cameras, Telephones, and Phonographs
Cameras, Telephones, and Phonographs
0 of 30 min
20
Image of Electric Light and Power
Electric Light and Power
0 of 32 min
21
Image of Department Stores and Modern Retailing
Department Stores and Modern Retailing
0 of 29 min
22
Image of Motion Pictures
Motion Pictures
0 of 28 min
23
Image of Surgery and the Operating Room
Surgery and the Operating Room
0 of 27 min
24
Image of Steel, Glass, and Plastics
Steel, Glass, and Plastics
0 of 33 min
25
Image of The Model T
The Model T
0 of 24 min
26
Image of Aviation—The “Wright” Time for Flight
Aviation—The “Wright” Time for Flight
0 of 26 min
27
Image of Radio and Television
Radio and Television
0 of 30 min
28
Image of Nuclear Power
Nuclear Power
0 of 31 min
29
Image of Household Appliances
Household Appliances
0 of 26 min
30
Image of Electronics and the Chip
Electronics and the Chip
0 of 26 min
31
Image of Satellites and Cell Phones
Satellites and Cell Phones
0 of 26 min
32
Image of Personal Computing
Personal Computing
0 of 28 min
33
Image of Genetic Engineering
Genetic Engineering
0 of 26 min
34
Image of The Internet
The Internet
0 of 25 min
35
Image of Social Media and Democracy
Social Media and Democracy
0 of 32 min
36
Image of Inventions and History
Inventions and History
0 of 31 min

Reviews

v********m
May 22, 2018
Enjoyed this course!

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s********m
February 27, 2018
OH MY GOSH I WISH I COULD KISS THE LECTURE AND MARRY IT ITS SO GOOD OMIGOSH ITS SO DOGONE GOOD LIKE XD LOL ITS GREAT I LOVE IT CAN U BUY THE DVD FOR THIS LECTURE OMIGOSH ITS SO GOOD LIKE LOL XD WHY IS IT SO GOOD BRAVO MAKE MORE IT SHOULDN'T OF ENDED OH MY GOSH WHY IS IT OVER I LOVED IT OMIGOSH LOL XD LOL XDXDXDXDXDXDXDXDXDXD LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL ITS SOOOOOOOOOOOO GOOD XD XD LOL LOL OMIGOSH IM CRYING CAUSE ITS OVER NOOOOOOOO PLS HEALP MEEEEEEE :> :> :> :> :>

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a********m
February 14, 2018
This engaging, very wide-ranging class isn't so much about "Understanding the Inventions" (how they work); rather, it is about understanding the HUMAN ELEMENT and the socio/political/historical CONTEXT of inventions. If, like me, you crave a more in-depth technical understanding, you'll always be left a little "underfed" intellectually by this course. BUT the course synopsis clear states that it's about "our understanding of history"... so, one cannot blame the course for offering exactly what it promised! A great strength of this course - and simultaneously its main weakness - is that it covers the WHOLE of history. That's a mind-boggling amount of material... and 36 half-hour lectures cannot begin to do justice to it. If the professor seems to always be rushing through, only briefly explaining the technologies - well, it's because he clearly has no choice, given the gargantuan breath of the materials! To me, that gives the feel of an "extended documentary" rather than a "full-fledged course". Nonetheless, viewed as a course about History, and the role of the invention process as a part of our history (as opposed to the "history of inventions" with a focus on the tech/engineering/science of the inventions), this course is phenomenal! Also, how and why inventions come about, and who does the inventing, and where. In particular, the course repeatedly dispels myths about a straightforward linear process from science to technology to use of the new invention. The earlier lectures, about the ancient and medieval worlds, gives an excellent perspective of the east/west element (China/Europe.) In many case, someone first invents something... but it's someone else, possibly in a very different society, that finds extensive use of the invention. To anyone who craves more technical details, I highly recommend combining this course with "Understanding Greek and Roman Technology", a Great Courses class that is taught by an engineer and vastly most focused on how inventions actually work (and, of course, covering a vastly shorter time span!)

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