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5

How Your Brain Uses Memory

Lecture no. 5 from the course: Your Best Brain

How Your Brain Uses Memory

Taught by Professor John Medina | 32 min | Categories: The Great Courses Plus Online Science Course

Why are scientists so unsure of the exact definition of intelligence? Explore the challenges of measuring and quantifying intelligence, including the problem with IQ tests. Find out how researchers currently think about intelligence, and the implications these ideas have on the way we design school curriculums.

Reviews

r********m
December 8, 2018
So many mistakes in this lesson. To set some things straight: 1. IQ tests don't vary a great deal. If the same people take different IQ tests, their results have an average correlation of .95 That's way more than any other psychological test could ever achieve and a strong hint that the results of IQ tests are indeed reliable. 2. The concept of g is strongly related to the concept of IQ. G seems to be fluid intelligence, which you need to learn and understand new things. The other half is called crystallized intelligence which represents the things you already learned. 3. We know already quite well why some people have a higher g-factor than others. Usually it is a combination of a few crucial factors: * the speed how fast information can be processed in the entire nervous system * the amount of information that can be manipulated in working memory * the efficiency of connections in the neural network (more intelligent people have fewer but stronger connections) * the overall size of the brain (particularly that of the praefrontal cortex and the parietal lobe) 4. Both, IQ and g factor not only play a role in educational attainment but are very strong predictors of many crucial outcomes in life such as income, job performance, (low) criminality and longevity - to name only a few. Even more so, the average IQ of the citizens of a country is the most important factor for how well a country will do by far. This adds lots of credibility that IQ tests measure indeed cognitive performance which is hugely important for how well you will do in life. 5. No, we do not "yet have to untangle the relative contributions of each [nature and nurture] to inteliigence". We know already quite well that at least for the IQ of adults in western countries genes have a far bigger influence, as the heritability of IQ for these people is >0.8 Right now genome-wide association studies make it more and more possible to exactly pinpoint the locations in the human gene pool that contribute to differences in IQ. This lesson is really done poorly and unnecessarily confusing. Even its title is misleading as IQ and memory are not the same thing. Who wants to get a better and much more profound understanding of IQ, g factor and what they measure should check out an expert on this subject: Prof Haier and his lecture "The intelligent brain".

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b********m
June 25, 2018

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s********m
November 9, 2017

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