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China, India, and the United States: The Future of Economic Supremacy

This specially crafted six-lecture course focuses on the three nations likely to be the 21st century’s economic giants—China, India, and the United States.
China, India, and the United States: The Future of Economic Supremacy is rated 3.9 out of 5 by 45.
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Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not much of a Historian Very basic, did not go into detail, or depth on the issues just headlines. In many ways he could have hit this at different angles, and used more historical points. Overall, I was very disappointed.
Date published: 2024-01-02
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Very Disappointing. It is unfortunate that such an interesting and important topic could be covered so superficially in six lectures. Anyone who keeps up with foreign affairs already knows more than what the lecturer covered. For example, when he discusses Chinese adjustment to a free market, he never reveals how that was done. He simply makes the statement that it happened. All the information the lecturer covered could have easily been completed in one lecture. This lecture was hardly worth the $19.95 I paid for it, and I hope no one paid more.
Date published: 2021-08-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good perspective It would have been nice to have an updated version that gives us a reading of today’s rivalry between the US and China. I find his projections to be accurate.
Date published: 2021-08-05
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Just Miserable This is my only bad review of a Great Lecture series in probably 20 years. But this course was so poor I feel compel to warn others. The level of intellectual analysis was roughly equivalent to a mediocre high-school level class. And, while some of its simplicity may be attributable to its age (I assume from context it was recorded in the early 2000s) that fact fails to account fin any way or the terrible pedagogy. It's almost as if the lecturer received a bonus payment based upon the number of times he used the word "amazing" in the first three lectures (which is the point at which I gave up.) I bought this on sale. Even at the dramatic discount, it wasn't close to being worth it.
Date published: 2021-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great overview Gave me great insights into the revolutionary impact of China's development
Date published: 2019-11-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Insightful & Informative First off, it should be noted that I am a historian and NOT an economist. And as a historian, I found the course to quite informative and insightful about the economic histories of the three countries. However, since I am not an economist, I did find the constant quoting of statistics to be overwhelming at times. Lastly, I was unimpressed by his predictions and was left wanting more. Overall, it was a good (but not great) course that was worth the price but I probably wouldn't recommend it to a friend unless they had a strong interest in the topic.
Date published: 2018-12-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Updating my understanding of China and India This quick study in Chinese and Indian economics and the role they play in the global market was good for someone just aware that these economies are becoming very important and how they affect the U.S. economy and cause changes.
Date published: 2018-10-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Extraordinarily Informative I had already completed a number of Great Courses in video format when I began this one. Although I was intrigued by its focus, I was concerned that I would not like the audio format. To my surprise I found that this was one of my favorite Great Courses. Professor Rodriguez clearly explained where the economies of China, India, and the United States have been, where they are now, and what their prospects are for the future. As a individual investor interested in international stocks, Professor Rodriguez helped me understand better the current and future investing landscape. I highly recommend this course to anyone interested in international investing.
Date published: 2018-10-04
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Overview

In the six provocative lectures of China, India, and the United States: The Future of Economic Supremacy, noted economist and award-winning Professor Peter Rodriguez previews what the next few decades of the global economy will look like in the wake of the miraculous growth rates of China and India. You'll also uncover what these developments mean for the economic future of the United States of America.

About

Peter Rodriguez

Our economic history is endlessly fascinating. Studying it and learning from it is critical to ensuring a robust future for the United States and the world.

INSTITUTION

Darden School of Business, University of Virginia

Dr. Peter Rodriguez is Associate Dean for International Affairs and Associate Professor at the Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia, where he teaches global macroeconomics and international business. The holder of a Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University, Professor Rodriguez has also taught at both that university and at Texas A&M, as well as at universities around the world, including on the water as a faculty member of Semester at Sea. His broad experience as a teacher—which has produced awards for teaching excellence wherever he has taught—goes hand-in-hand with significant real-world experience in the realm of business, which has drawn on his skills as both an educator and a practitioner.   Professor Rodriguez's private teaching engagements include work with the AES Corporation, Harris Corporation, Rolls Royce, and Visa, among other companies. He also worked for several years in the Global Energy Group at JPMorgan Chase, where his assignments centered on work for multinationals such as Royal Dutch Shell, Pennzoil, Apache Corporation, and Santa Fe Energy Resources. His current research interests include the interaction of globalization, economic development, and social institutions; the consequences of corruption for multinationals; and seed-stage finance in emerging markets.

By This Professor

China, India, and the United States: The Future of Economic Supremacy

Trailer

The Narrowing Economic Gap

01: The Narrowing Economic Gap

Take an insightful look back at the dramatic economic histories of the United States, China, and India between 1961 and 2010—a period that offers a strong foundation for thinking carefully about what the global economic situation of the next 20 years may look like. In particular, explore the impact of such trends and programs as America’s post–World War II economic boom, Mao’s disastrous Great Leap Forward, India’s triumphant independence from Great Britain, and the paralyzing global recession of 2008.

31 min
China’s Economic Miracle

02: China’s Economic Miracle

China’s recent economic growth is the most miraculous economic story in world history. But it’s a uniquely Chinese story that perhaps no other nation could have written. What about China’s culture and politics changed to produce such spectacularly rapid growth? Does the successful Chinese approach represent a new model for economic growth in other countries? How sustainable is this growth in the long run? Professor Rodriguez reveals the answers to these and other questions here.

31 min
India’s Rise from Isolationism

03: India’s Rise from Isolationism

India’s economic growth, which emerged after decades of lost opportunities, is primed to earn the country a place among the most influential world economies of the 21st century. In this fascinating lecture, accomplish three main objectives. First, grasp the root causes behind why India’s economy was terrible for so long. Second, learn why India’s rapid growth is happening right now, and not decades earlier. And third, discover what India’s unprecedented economic success means for India—and for the world.

30 min
The U.S. at the End of the Old Global Order

04: The U.S. at the End of the Old Global Order

Will the end of American economic supremacy mean the end of American prosperity? Make sense of this provocative question by charting the rise of American economic “exceptionalism” during the 1990s; investigate why the era of a U.S.-dominated global economy is ending and how the Triffin Paradox helps explain these reasons; and find out why this dramatic change may in fact be the only way to ensure America’s future prosperity and its ability to continue growing.

27 min
Strategies for the New Economic Order

05: Strategies for the New Economic Order

The next decade will be an absolutely critical one for the future of the world economy. Using his keen economic and historical knowledge, Professor Rodriguez explores the future of America and China’s economic relationship; helps you make sense of the massive changes and challenges India faces in the coming years; illustrates specific steps that the United States can take to rebalance its economy; and demonstrates why the global recession of 2008 was, in actuality, a transformational moment.

30 min
The Future of the 3 Economic Powers

06: The Future of the 3 Economic Powers

Look further ahead and address the questions that loom the largest when thinking about the economies of America, China, and India. What can we expect from each of these three countries in the next 20 years? How will each country contribute, in its own distinct way, to the new economic landscape currently being formed? How ready are China and India to assume the power coming their way? And how influential will America continue to be in the new global economy?

31 min