Earth at the Crossroads: Understanding the Ecology of a Changing Planet

Rated 1 out of 5 by from Elementary school level The presentation was at a very basic level. The presenter droned about simple ideas as if they were monumental concepts including irrelevant information about his personal experiences that did nothing to educate. I learned nothing from it. The data presented was always 10 or more years out of date.
Date published: 2020-09-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hope for the Future I bought this course because I care about the planet and wanted to have a better understanding of its ecosystems. Dr. Strauss delivers his extensive background in ecological theory and practice from his a own field work and case studies in a relaxed and engaging manner. The material he covers is more relevant today then when this course first appeared 10 years ago. His presentation on urban ecology at the end of the 36 lectures I found most poignant. He discusses the impacts mass movement to cities, climate change, waste management, energy cycles and zoonotics (COVID 19, Ebola) have had on the planet and makes suggestions that offer hope for a better future for our natural and urban environments. Since we have entered the anthripocene, it is clearly evident that we need to find a balance in our use of the earths resources. I look forward to and hope for a second edition of this course with Dr. Strauss.
Date published: 2020-09-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent Course I bought this course to give me an in-depth view of the changing environment. The DVD format showed the instructor using visual aids which proved useful in better understanding the course content.
Date published: 2019-10-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent presentation of complex interactions This is a great course to get a good understanding about all the various factors and elements contained in "ecology" and how they interact - climate change is just one of these. Professor Strauss just lays out the facts, no preaching. The information in this course should receive wide dissemination, particularly to our governing representatives and schools at all levels.
Date published: 2019-10-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from THE COURSE EARTH AT THE CROSSROADS--ON TARGET EXCELLENCE!
Date published: 2019-09-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The professor was very well informed We are really enjoying this series of lectures. This man is telling it as it is. Climate change is here and not "believing" what is going on is a real story of refuting the scientific method. This series should be required in all high school classes. He does a fairly good job of not making us all feel like jerks for not immediately giving up animal protein , leather, all pesticides and fertilizers. We would appreciate a few more photos of some of plants and animals discussed since they sound so interesting. His voice is easy to listen to and does not put me to sleep. We have learned a great deal from the lectures and still have a few more to go. As with virtually every ecologist in the land, there has not yet been any mention of the other side of the equation. Our destructive use of finite resources gets a lot of attention, but very little is said about how to reduce the demand for those resources. How about some mention of the effects of population rates? I am not suggesting anything Draconian, but how about providing all persons of reproductive age with the knowledge and means to prevent the unexpected and unwanted. Parenthood should be voluntary, not an unwelcome burden. This is not to say I expect the professor to lecture on anything involving reproduction. That is not the reason for this course. However, I would think that a comment about supply versus demand in the use of our shared resources by a larger and larger population merits some mention.
Date published: 2019-03-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Revieving my classes from college Although many of the lectures are a review for me, there is so much to learn. I enjoy watching the lectures whenever I have time.
Date published: 2019-02-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Mediocre Course on an Essential Topic This course suffers from poor organization. By his own account Professor Strauss has divided most of the content into two broad sections. The first covers “forces” that cause ecosystems to change over time, including flows of energy, materials, water, food and toxic substances.” The second focuses on “ecological interactions and process,” such as population, migration, disease, microevolutionary change, and coevolution. In practice, though, it’s impossible to separate the “flows” from the “interactions,” so there is a lot of repetition. Talk of the world’s “biocapacity” in Lecture 2 is largely another way of talking about population, which is in Lecture 25. Biomagnification first receives explanation in Lecture 4 and then more detailed treatment in Lectures 17 and 18. Repeated almost ad nauseam is the fact is that birds lose up to half their body weight during migration, proving the importance of preserving “stopping points” along the way where they can feed and rest. The real structure of this course, as you can see from the lecture list, is that he introduces or returns to ecological process X in one lecture and then examines the human impact in the next. It’s not terrible, but it lacks the feeling of progressive learning, beginning with fundamentals and then moving up to more sophisticated levels. Professor Strauss is also a rather dull lecturer, resorting too often to jargon like “biomagnify” or “downstream impact.” His diction is occasionally awkward, such as using the transitive verb “reduce” as an intransitive verb, rather than “decline” or “shrink.” He over-relies on the stock phrase “It turns out that…” to evoke interest in the viewer. Lecture 23 on genetics and microevolution is difficult to understand, even in the guidebook—you have to know what he’s talking about to know what he’s talking about. These defects are regrettable, because ecology is indeed a very important subject. In so many ways we humans and especially our for-profit corporations are villains in the “Tragedy of the Commons”—the famous title of Garret Hardin’s book. Individually and in specific groups we extract land, plants, animals and dump waste into air, water and soil while ignoring the collective costs to the natural environment, other groups of people or the entire world. Overfishing is one easy example, as is the way Pennsylvania farmers allow fertilizer runoff into streams that feed the Chesapeake Bay. The suburban sprawl that affluent Americans like to live in profits developers, contractors and realtors, but wipes out wildlife habitats and burdens roads with more traffic, inconveniencing drivers in general. Global warming is perhaps the largest-scale “tragedy of the commons,” in which some countries like the US and China pollute their way to prosperity, emitting carbon dioxide that warms the globe, threatens shoreline communities everywhere and changes or destroys living conditions for other species like the polar bear. Of course, ecology is as much about natural processes that would operate in the absence of humans, but in a world with seven billion people, the human factor degrades everything—the seas, the wetlands, the mountains, the rainforests, the river valleys, the deserts, and everything in them. Although not the best presenter, Professor Strauss bolsters his case with lots of column graphs, line charts, scatter charts, diagrams and tables, of which I counted at least eighty-eight during the lectures. In Lecture 2, for example, you can see declines in cod and lobster landings in millions of kilograms from 1980 to 2000. Lecture 8 shows the increase of energy consumption per person from 214 BTUs in 1949 to 359 in 1978-78, with a slight decline to 337 in 2007. In Lecture 16 you can see how much more wasteful cattle are as a food source (in terms of energy to feed per kilocalories of animal protein) than poultry. Lecture 19’s fir tree illustration shows how different warbler species live in different parts of it. Lecture 32 has a helpful diagram showing the life cycle of a tick. Unfortunately, none of them appears in the guidebook. Overall, Strauss is an environmental optimist, arguing that humans, once properly educated, can soften their impact on the environment and reverse damage to it. Government regulation has made food safer than it used to be, reduced lead emissions by ninety percent since 1970, allowed temperate forests to recover, required recycling of solid waste, and saved a few endangered animal species. He believes that we can conserve natural resources without sacrificing a good quality of life. I don’t share his optimism, at least so far as the US is concerned, because our culture of wealth accumulation and mass consumption celebrates human domination over nature rather than coexistence with it, refuses to admit costs that can be dumped onto someone or something else, rejects government regulation as an infringement of the liberty to chase profits, and dismisses scientists who dare to challenge the status quo as conspiring scoundrels. Consider our current president, who has publicly called climate change a “Chinese hoax” and points to annual winter cold as proof that the atmosphere isn’t really getting warmer. In any case, you may still want to buy this course despite my rather unfavorable review. You will learn about trophic pyramids, nutrient cycling, biomagnification, biodiversity, limiting factors, habitat fragmentation, living things as bags of genes, and urban coyotes.
Date published: 2019-02-24
  • y_2020, m_10, d_18, h_16
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvrr, vn_bulk_3.0.12
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_0, tr_25
  • loc_en_CA, sid_1720, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=SUBMISSION_TIME, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_teachco
  • bvseo_sdk, p_sdk, 3.2.1
  • CLOUD, getReviews, 4.49ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT
An Ecological Diagnosis of the Living Earth
1: An Ecological Diagnosis of the Living Earth

What is ecology? This introductory lecture considers key topics and concepts you'll encounter as you study the complex interactions of Earth's biosphere—and raises the question of humankind's place within this great network of relationships.

35 min
Humanity and the Tragedy of the Commons
2: Humanity and the Tragedy of the Commons

Although human beings are a relatively young species, we have had a huge impact on the planet we inhabit. Here, consider some of the ramifications of this effect, focusing on a fundamental principle of ecology, the Tragedy of the Commons, and see this principle at work in the fishing industry.

31 min
Ecology-Natural History to Holistic Science
3: Ecology-Natural History to Holistic Science

In the last century, ecology emerged as a new area of study that draws from diverse disciplines, including natural history, biology, botany, and zoology, to forge a holistic understanding of life on earth. Chart the history of this burgeoning field and the great minds that shaped its development.

33 min
Ecology as a System-Presses and Pulses
4: Ecology as a System-Presses and Pulses

All ecosystems are constantly in flux. Begin to explore the biological, geological, and physical forces that drive change in the Earth's ecosystems, and develop an appreciation of the important role played in ecology by social factors, including public policy and shifts in human demography.

30 min
Climate and Habitat-Twin Ecological Crises
5: Climate and Habitat-Twin Ecological Crises

Apply what you learned in the last lecture about the forces of change within the Earth's ecological system to understand two crucial aspects in today's world: climate change and habitat destruction.

29 min
Human Society as Ecological Driver
6: Human Society as Ecological Driver

Human power structures, social organization, information flow, and cultural practices can profoundly change the shape of ecosystems. Examine the role of humans as "ecosystem engineers" as you look more closely at some of the social forces and practices that affect the ecology of our planet.

30 min
Movement of Energy through Living Systems
7: Movement of Energy through Living Systems

Begin your consideration of specific forces that cause ecosystem change by examining the flow of energy. You trace how energy moves through ecosystems, from sunlight through the transitions of food production, consumption, and decomposition.

29 min
Humans as Energy Consumers
8: Humans as Energy Consumers

Humans are the most voracious consumers of energy on the planet, and our appetite for energy produces enormous short- and long-term challenges to ecological sustainability. Investigate human energy consumption habits and examine alternatives to traditional ways of accessing energy.

30 min
Nutrient Cycling in Ecosystems
9: Nutrient Cycling in Ecosystems

While energy moves from the sun through organisms and is ultimately lost to the atmosphere, crucial organic molecules are recycled endlessly. Learn how two of these essential building blocks of life—carbon and nitrogen—move through the ecosystem.

32 min
The Challenges of Waste and Disposal
10: The Challenges of Waste and Disposal

Just as organic nutrients remain in the environment, so, too, do the byproducts of human life. Consider the impact of human trash on the environment and examine alternatives to the current strategies of waste disposal.

29 min
The Water Cycle and Climate
11: The Water Cycle and Climate

Water, like all other molecules in ecosystems, is recycled endlessly. Investigate the process by which water circulates through the ecosystem and examine the role water plays as a living system in pollution abatement and long-term sustainability.

30 min
Human Water Use and Climate Change
12: Human Water Use and Climate Change

Human water consumption is growing at an astounding rate. The depletion of water resources threatens ecosystems, contributes to changes in climate, and renders human communities more vulnerable to disaster and disease. Examine how human behavior is affecting water reserves and explore strategies for conserving this precious resource.

31 min
Rain and Heat-Forces That Shape Climate
13: Rain and Heat-Forces That Shape Climate

Why do some regions develop desert climates, while others become rainforests? What adaptations must organisms make to survive in these habitats? Examine the role of water and weather in determining the characteristics of different ecosystems, and learn how organisms develop mechanisms to thrive in extreme environments.

29 min
The Ecology of Global Climate Change
14: The Ecology of Global Climate Change

Most experts in climatology agree: The Earth is rapidly warming, and while the causes are complex, human technology is most likely contributing to this trend. Investigate the role of climate change on shifting animal migratory patterns, life-cycle fluctuations in plants, and the disappearance of marine habitats, and consider ways to reduce the impact of climate change on the Earth's ecosystems.

31 min
How Living Organisms Acquire Food
15: How Living Organisms Acquire Food

Return to the topic of energy flow within ecosystems to consider the interaction between producers and consumers within a complex pattern called the food web. Examine how this relationship shapes plant distribution and animal behavior, and consider what happens when these systems experience stress due to ecosystem fragmentation and species extirpation.

31 min
The Ecological Consequences of Agriculture
16: The Ecological Consequences of Agriculture

The current model for food production and distribution in developed countries creates a large and growing burden on the Earth's biosphere. Explore the role of modern large-scale agriculture in the dynamics of ecosystems, and consider alternative models for food production and delivery.

31 min
Food, Energy Flows, Biomagnification
17: Food, Energy Flows, Biomagnification

One effect of the food web is that nutrients and chemicals become concentrated in organisms at the top of the food chain. In this lecture, learn how this process, called biomagnification, both benefits living organisms and leads to the concentration of toxic substances, including DDT and PCBs.

31 min
The Human Ecology of Biomagnification
18: The Human Ecology of Biomagnification

Take a closer look at some of the negative effects of biomagnification that can be traced to human activity. Examine several examples of human-influenced biomagnification, including the appearance of organic pollutants in human breast milk and the notorious case of mercury poisoning in the human and animal populations of Minamata Bay, Japan.

29 min
The Ecological Community as a Living Mosaic
19: The Ecological Community as a Living Mosaic

Local ecological communities are complex aggregations of living and nonliving forces. Take a look at these living mosaics by exploring predator and prey relationships, interactions of competition and cooperation, and the effect of large-scale disturbances such as fires and flood.

30 min
Wildlife Adaptation to Human Landscapes
20: Wildlife Adaptation to Human Landscapes

Following World War II, suburban living spread in human populations, fragmenting wildlife habitats and disrupting ecosystems near urban landscapes. Examine the effects of increasing urbanization and the strategies species develop to adapt to ecosystems now dominated by human communities.

33 min
Biodiversity, Disturbance, Invasive Species
21: Biodiversity, Disturbance, Invasive Species

One of the elements that can help bring stability to an ecosystem is biodiversity, or the diversity of life within an ecosystem. Here, begin to consider the phenomena that impact biodiversity, including forest fires, deforestation, and competition posed by the invasion of nonnative species.

30 min
Biodiversity Decline and Restoration Ecology
22: Biodiversity Decline and Restoration Ecology

As human populations have soared, urban areas have expanded to accommodate more residents. In this lecture, explore the effects of urbanization on local and regional biodiversity as well as actions that can mitigate negative impact and enhance local ecosystems.

32 min
Microevolution and Biological Variation
23: Microevolution and Biological Variation

Healthy populations of organisms have enough genetic variability to withstand ecological change. Examine the processes and conditions that contribute to the production of biological variation within a population and how that variation can help stabilize the entire ecosystem.

30 min
Human Impacts on Ecological Space and Time
24: Human Impacts on Ecological Space and Time

As humans carve up landscapes and reshape them with nonnative plants and animals for their own use, biodiversity in those areas decreases, leaving native species subject to extinction. Consider what is lost when the biodiversity is suppressed, and explore ways in which humans can coexist with healthy local ecosystems.

29 min
Population Growth and Its Natural Limits
25: Population Growth and Its Natural Limits

No aspect of ecology is more fundamental to resiliency than the way in which natural populations grow. Examine the models that help describe population growth, and review the different strategies and behaviors that species have developed to maintain population size and support the resiliency of their habitats.

31 min
The Human Shift to an Urban Lifestyle
26: The Human Shift to an Urban Lifestyle

Humans have undergone a massive demographic transition as over half of the human population has moved from rural to urban lifestyles. Investigate how this shift has created a unique set of ecological characteristics, and consider the challenges posed by urban infrastructure on environmental sustainability.

30 min
The Ecology of Dispersal and Migration
27: The Ecology of Dispersal and Migration

In response to seasonal conditions, the threat of predators, mating behaviors, and the availability of food, some organisms have to move long distances in order to complete their lifecycles. Here, explore the costs and benefits of migration and consider the challenges organisms face during these long, dangerous treks.

30 min
Human Impacts on Animal Migration
28: Human Impacts on Animal Migration

Human land-use practices have disrupted the migratory patterns of many species, which are now threatened with extinction as a result of this disruption. Investigate the unique ecological requirements of migratory species, as well as some of the management strategies to facilitate animal movement across urbanized landscapes and agricultural ecosystems.

30 min
Ecology and Economy of Sex and Reproduction
29: Ecology and Economy of Sex and Reproduction

Why do organisms reproduce sexually? What is gained by this costly and often risky form of reproduction? What behaviors have species developed to mitigate those risks? Explore these questions and develop an understanding of the ecology of reproduction and its implication for ecological sustainability and biodiversity.

33 min
Cities and the Human Demographic Transition
30: Cities and the Human Demographic Transition

Shifting demographic patterns toward industrialization and urbanization have dramatically reduced the size of nuclear families all over the world. Explore the ecological forces that select for large and small families among the human species and what this phenomenon suggests for our future sustainability.

32 min
Coevolution among Species
31: Coevolution among Species

Many species live so close to each other that they affect each other's evolutionary trajectories through a process called coevolution. Analyze the many forms of coevolution, including mutualism, predator-prey arms races, mimicry, camouflage, and deception, and consider how the rapid decline of the world's ecosystems places these relationships in peril.

31 min
The Coevolution of Human Diseases
32: The Coevolution of Human Diseases

Take a closer look at a particular example of coevolution: the development of zoonotic diseases (diseases that spread from animals to people) in human beings, including Lyme disease and West Nile fever. Also, learn how climate change and habitat fragmentation affect the spread of infectious diseases.

29 min
Strategies for Reversing Ecosystem Decline
33: Strategies for Reversing Ecosystem Decline

In conservation biology and restoration ecology, scientists study how to sustain natural ecosystems and preserve the populations of declining species. Review some of the ways experts have sought to rebuild damaged habitats as you consider current debates about the efficacy and ethics of these interventions.

31 min
Designing Spaces for Wildlife
34: Designing Spaces for Wildlife

Continue your examination of conservation biology with a consideration of park design and the effort to preserve green spaces. Since precious resources go into conservation, scientists and policymakers must make difficult decisions about which species to include in recovery plans.

33 min
Toward Sustainable Urban Ecosystems
35: Toward Sustainable Urban Ecosystems

As human populations grow and evolve, the need to make conscious, positive transformations in the way people live becomes increasingly important. Explore the new field of urban ecology as it seeks to understand and improve the ecology of cities around the world.

31 min
Recovering Ecosystems-Hope for the Future
36: Recovering Ecosystems-Hope for the Future

While human activity has put many habitats at risk, much is being done to heal damaged and threatened ecosystems. Examine some of the ways ecological thinking and action can simultaneously preserve these habitats and enhance the health and well-being of human communities.

38 min
Eric G. Strauss

To understand ecology is to reveal the nature of ourselves and our relationship with the species around us.

ALMA MATER

Loyola Marymount University

INSTITUTION

Tufts University

About Eric G. Strauss

Dr. Eric G. Strauss is Presidential Professor in Ecology at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. He is one of the founding science directors of the Urban Ecology Institute at Boston College, where he previously was Director of the Environmental Studies Program and Research Associate Professor. He received his undergraduate education at Emerson College and earned his Ph.D. from Tufts University. An active researcher, Professor Strauss has been an investigator on a number of groundbreaking collaborative studies, including a study of the conservation biology of piping plovers and studies of the eastern coyote and diamondback terrapin. He serves as the editor-in-chief for the journal Cities and the Environment and continues to research and participate in collaborative activities at the Urban Ecology Institute. In addition, Professor Strauss was lead author on a nationally successful biology textbook, Biology: The Web of Life, and hosted the accompanying video series, Biology Alive! Dr. Strauss also served on the Barnstable Conservation Commission and on the boards of directors for the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History and the Association for the Preservation of Cape Cod.

Also By This Professor