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How Colors Affect You: What Science Reveals

Discover how color influences your brain—and how you can use those insights to your advantage—in this eye-opening course from a best-selling author and expert on design.

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Reviews

l********m
July 7, 2019
What a great lecture!!! I learned so much about and how to apply color in ALL areas of my life/art/work. I had several *aha* moments when I realized what I instinctively did right but also some *ouch* moments when I saw some things I did wrong and how that may have affected how I am seen, how my product at shows and online may be perceived, and how my mood has been affected. With that being said I feel I have some course adjustments to make.

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g********m
June 21, 2019

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g********m
June 3, 2019
the more that I think about this course, the more I see room for improvement. In the opening lecture, Professor Lidwell says that he's focusing on the six first colors that people across cultures identify, gong more or less in the order in which the colors are named. While this is an interesting premise, and a good way to organize the lecture. Color is far more intricate than the first six (main) colors that we recognize, such as red, blue, yellow, green, black and white. I have no memory of him discussing how color saturation affects us (such as if pastel and bold hues have the same affects). He also didn't even so much as allude to secondary colors such as orange or purple, and if their affects are similar to the primary colors that make them, or if they have affects distinctly their own. Nor does he talk about the affect that color combinations have upon us, like red and green side by side. Even if he couldn't give a lecture on every color in the spectrum, or every nuance on this complex subject, with just one or two more lectures, this course could've gained immense breadth and depth.

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