You updated your password.

Reset Password

Enter the email address you used to create your account. We will email you instructions on how to reset your password.

Forgot Your Email Address? Contact Us

Reset Your Password

SHOW
SHOW

Pilot Lecture: Max Planck and the Ultraviolet Catastrophe

Buddy up with Max Planck as he sets about to revolutionize quantum physics-and makes us think twice about toasting a slice of bread.
Wondrium Pilots: Max Planck and the Ultraviolet Catastrophe is rated 4.3 out of 5 by 25.
  • y_2024, m_7, d_18, h_4
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvrr, vn_bulk_3.0.42
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_2, tr_23
  • loc_en_CA, sid_90040, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=SUBMISSION_TIME, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_teachco
  • bvseo_sdk, p_sdk, 3.2.1
  • CLOUD, getAggregateRating, 32.88ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great pilot! How the quantum mechanics and thoery got it start! Interesting short pilot for learning complex and imaginative theory of science in last hundred years. Thanks Wondrium to produce this one, and hopefully we'll get the full course soon!
Date published: 2024-01-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Full Course Please This is excellent and I wish it would be made into a course. It being based on his book is fine, we can read it as well.
Date published: 2023-11-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Not for the dilettante Just after the 6 minute mark the presentation took off without warning me to hold on and for the rest of the trip it was all desperate, futile, efforts to catch up. The transitions were confusing and it all quickly devolved into models based on mental constructs that apparently resolved the cosmic questions arising from my toaster. It was not a satisfying experience and left me wondering whether the fault was not in my stars but in me. The Skaar and the Anonymous ("read the book") reviews below are right on.
Date published: 2022-12-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An Excellent Presenter Looking forward to the course, I may struggle with the subject matter, but think I have half a chance with this presenter.
Date published: 2021-02-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Literally just the book. This lecture is essentially the first chapter from his (Chard Orzel's) book, Breakfast with Einstein: The Exotic Physics of Everyday Objects. The order he presents everything in is the same, the examples are the same, the approach is the same, the words and phrases he uses are the same (including the phrase "this is like 'catnip for physicists." He's practically reading his own book. My advice, read the book; don't watch the lecture. I can only assume that were this lecture an actual series of lectures offered, each subsequent lesson would have just followed another chapter in his book.
Date published: 2021-02-24
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Sorry, bad presentation I've studied a lot of physics, and I just don't think this lecture does a good job of explaining this topic. I think it needs better visuals. A picture of the "black box", and what's going on inside, with each sentence uttered, would be very helpful. Also, some basic displayed arithmetic during the explanation of fundamentals and integer-only modes would have helped. He seems to skip through this too quickly. I agree with the other reviewer that the optics detracted from the presentation. The listener is looking up at the professor, while he looks down, and that distortion is distracting.
Date published: 2021-01-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very interesting I found his discussion of the subject to be very interesting, and I feel I understand black box radiation somewhat better than I did. Of course a brief lecture can only give the broad outlines, but it gave me some understanding and interest in finding out more. I liked the lecturer; he seemed knowledgeable and approachable and I will look for more talks from him.
Date published: 2020-11-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I enjoyed the Pilot. It piqued my interest. I would like to explore the topic in more detail. The professor did a very good job at introducing a tough topic and he is very relatable.
Date published: 2020-11-09
  • y_2024, m_7, d_18, h_4
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvrr, vn_bulk_3.0.42
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_2, tr_23
  • loc_en_CA, sid_90040, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=SUBMISSION_TIME, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_teachco
  • bvseo_sdk, p_sdk, 3.2.1
  • CLOUD, getReviews, 3.46ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT

Overview

Get to know how German theoretical physicist Max Planck revolutionized the world of quantum physics and why you're looking at how quantum physics got its start every time you toast a slice of bread.
Max Planck and the Ultraviolet Catastrophe

01: Max Planck and the Ultraviolet Catastrophe

Quantum physics is known to be hard to understand; really, really weird; and very far removed from our everyday reality. Join Professor Chad Orzel to demystify the world of quantum physics, starting with all the ways you observe the key phenomena that make up the science of quantum physics. You’ll gain a new appreciation for your toaster!

20 min