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Pilot Lecture: The Developing Brain

Fast-forward through a human lifespan for a revealing look at how our brains grow and change throughout our lives.
Wondrium Pilots: The Developing Brain is rated 4.7 out of 5 by 19.
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Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great pilot! Pretty good pilot! Brain and its evolution put in a concise pilot lecture by a renowned professor. I enjoyed it and learned something new. I hope Wondrium turn this to a complete course!
Date published: 2024-02-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Must know Topic very very good. what a topic and lecture. She is simply superb. I enjoyed her presentation. she made a complicated topic very simple and understandable.
Date published: 2023-12-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Well presented A well-presented and easy to follow. I really enjoyed watching this and I'd love to see more from this presenter.
Date published: 2023-05-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Great Taster. I liked this a lot. Prof. has a great style of delivery making subject matter interesting and easy to understand. I would def. buy this it it developed into a course.
Date published: 2022-12-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Valuable addition to the Brain and Neuro lineup Great start to a valuable topic, how do our (children's) brains develop, and what effect do the latest changes, the age of screens, have on development now. My grandparents had no TV, for my parents it was rare, common for me, and my child seeks endless screentime. It comes at the expense of exercise and direct social contact that thousands of unseen and forgotten generations experienced. The lecture was well thought out and clearly presented. My own interest, at the moment, is in the need for expressive language for receptive learning: do we need to be able to tell ourselves what we have learned to consolidate it. (Are there rare cases of learning disability explained by this, and does it explain performance variations.) This may not happen with screen time for example, the normal give and take is reduced. In my experience, TV was largely intellectual sleepwalking, and there was no lasting engagement unlike relationships. But I'll be interested in however the professor approaches the subject, it will be interesting to walk through how she sees it. I'm excited about this course! It will appeal to parents as well as those with an intellectual interest in the brain.
Date published: 2022-09-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Critical insight This course seems to focus on critical understandings that are only touched on in other courses about the brain. How we evolved from lower animals and how our brains evolved from lower animals is crucial to understanding how our brain works, how our brain develops and how we learn and interact with one another. I found the lecture very exciting and can't wait to see the next lecture.
Date published: 2021-07-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from All Over The Place The lecture seemed to meander all over the place and often be repetitive. It also seemed to go on forever since it lacked the kind of logical structure that leads you through a topic. The lecturer is so-so and uses examples that are far-fetched, forced and too "cute" for my taste.
Date published: 2021-05-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Too much "history" of the brain Not too interesting, just listening to her talk. I presume the later lectures will include real time pictures and talk about the development of the brain. I guess this is okay for beginners who have not studied biology, but I wasn't looking for a lecture on evolution, really. I give it a 3.
Date published: 2021-05-05
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Overview

Trace the evolutionary history of humans and how the modern world and its technologies affect how our brains develop.
The Developing Brain

01: The Developing Brain

Measured nucleotide by nucleotide, the human genome is nearly 99% identical to that of the chimpanzee. So why don’t we live in trees? Professor Gabrielle Principe takes us back 2 million years to learn how the choices we made back then have kept our species alive, and how the modern world and its technologies continue to affect how our brains develop.

35 min