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Ancient Civilizations of North America

Join the Director of the Maya Exploration Center to discover the astounding accomplishments of the ancient North Americans and their significant legacy.

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Reviews

w********m
October 14, 2018

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g********t
October 9, 2018
Excellent subject content but the Professor's continued interjection of his personal opinions about what the viewer should conclude detracts from the course. As a senior citizen taking advantage of discounted state university courses, I think this course is in line with how history courses are taught now -- as grievance studies. The root cause of the dumbing down is I think that less cognitively capable students flood the classrooms, due to easy federal funding and no entrance testing--no ACT, no SAT, no GRE, which used to filter out those with lower IQ. So these students must be told what to think and to whom to direct their grievance as well what to know about the subject. This course reflects these new teaching techniques.

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l********m
September 30, 2018
This is a truly fascinating course, but I can't help feeling sad that so much of the rich history of the original peoples of North & South America has been harshly and painfully destroyed for the sake of expansion - stretching from colonial times, all the way through to modern injustices like oil pipe lines in the Dakota's. The research that Edwin Barnhart has done, and is presenting here, is just the tip of a complex iceberg. The course opens with an incredibly passionate plea to use modern archeological dating practices such as BCE and CE rather than BC and AD, which I applaud. Next he weaves together a tapestry of the earliest settlers who walked across Barringaria (The Baring Straight) and how those early inhabitants have been mapped and linked through DNA using Haplotype - the Kennewick Man (a skeleton found in my native state of Washington) has been identified as being from one of the first waves into the continent. Other notable topics which this lecture focuses on are the Mississippian cultures, who built pyramids that somehow ended up not being noted in any school textbook I've ever had. As well as topics ranging from Medicine Wheels, Dreamcatchers, Cave Glyphs, Architectural studies, Astronomy - both lunar and equinox influencers, and Burial Rights. In particular, for me, being a life long Washingtonian, was the later lectures on the Pacific Northwest. I actually remember being a kid and going to a replica plank house where we got to sit by the communal hearth and experience (albeit for an hour) what life in a coastal village might be like. It's so fascinating to me to hear that farming wasn't a part of daily life in this region, but rather complex hunter/gathering persisted well into European contact. So much of my life has been spent studying and appreciating these cultures, and I'm so pleased to find a kindred spirit in Edwin Barnhart. This lecture is a must for anyone interested in Native American studies, or a richer history of the entire land we now call America, and home.

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