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The Industrial Revolution

Discover the inventors, business leaders, and ordinary workers who created our modern industrial world in a fascinating course taught by a top-rated professor.

Watch First Lecture

36 Lectures

1
Image of Industrialization Is Good for You
Industrialization Is Good for You
0 of 31 min
2
Image of Why Was Britain First?
Why Was Britain First?
0 of 28 min
3
Image of The Agricultural Revolution
The Agricultural Revolution
0 of 31 min
4
Image of Cities and Manufacturing Traditions
Cities and Manufacturing Traditions
0 of 31 min
5
Image of The Royal Shipyards
The Royal Shipyards
0 of 30 min
6
Image of The Textile Industry
The Textile Industry
0 of 29 min
7
Image of Coal Mining—Powering the Revolution
Coal Mining—Powering the Revolution
0 of 30 min
8
Image of Iron—Coking and Puddling
Iron—Coking and Puddling
0 of 27 min
9
Image of Wedgwood and the Pottery Business
Wedgwood and the Pottery Business
0 of 31 min
10
Image of Building Britain’s Canals
Building Britain’s Canals
0 of 31 min
11
Image of Steam Technology and the First Railways
Steam Technology and the First Railways
0 of 29 min
12
Image of The Railway Revolution
The Railway Revolution
0 of 31 min
13
Image of Isambard Kingdom Brunel—Master Engineer
Isambard Kingdom Brunel—Master Engineer
0 of 30 min
14
Image of The Machine-Tool Makers
The Machine-Tool Makers
0 of 31 min
15
Image of The Worker's-Eye View
The Worker's-Eye View
0 of 32 min
16
Image of Poets, Novelists, and Factories
Poets, Novelists, and Factories
0 of 31 min
17
Image of How Industry Changed Politics
How Industry Changed Politics
0 of 31 min
18
Image of Dismal Science—The Economists
Dismal Science—The Economists
0 of 31 min
19
Image of American Pioneers—Whitney and Lowell
American Pioneers—Whitney and Lowell
0 of 31 min
20
Image of Steamboats and Factories in America
Steamboats and Factories in America
0 of 32 min
21
Image of Why Europe Started Late
Why Europe Started Late
0 of 28 min
22
Image of Bismarck, De Lesseps, and Eiffel
Bismarck, De Lesseps, and Eiffel
0 of 31 min
23
Image of John D. Rockefeller and Standard Oil
John D. Rockefeller and Standard Oil
0 of 28 min
24
Image of Andrew Carnegie and American Steel
Andrew Carnegie and American Steel
0 of 30 min
25
Image of American Industrial Labor
American Industrial Labor
0 of 28 min
26
Image of Anglo-American Contrasts
Anglo-American Contrasts
0 of 30 min
27
Image of Electric Shocks and Surprises
Electric Shocks and Surprises
0 of 30 min
28
Image of Mass-Producing Bicycles and Cars
Mass-Producing Bicycles and Cars
0 of 30 min
29
Image of Taking Flight—The Dream Becomes Reality
Taking Flight—The Dream Becomes Reality
0 of 29 min
30
Image of Industrial Warfare, 1914–1918
Industrial Warfare, 1914–1918
0 of 32 min
31
Image of Expansion and the Great Depression
Expansion and the Great Depression
0 of 30 min
32
Image of Mass Production Wins World War II
Mass Production Wins World War II
0 of 29 min
33
Image of The Information Revolution
The Information Revolution
0 of 28 min
34
Image of Asian Tigers—The New Industrialized Nations
Asian Tigers—The New Industrialized Nations
0 of 27 min
35
Image of Environmental Paradoxes
Environmental Paradoxes
0 of 32 min
36
Image of The Benign Transformation
The Benign Transformation
0 of 32 min

Reviews

m********m
July 4, 2019
Professor Allitt must be granted Tenure by The Great Courses! I have now watched two of his courses, and have more than just enjoyed and learned from them, I have found him to be a rare exemplar (among many academics) of a balanced insightfulness and common sense. In tackling this ambitious course, Professor Allitt needed to tackle history, science, technology, and political economy and present it in an engaging fashion, relying on story telling and not on diagrams and charts. He also needed to focus his coverage to the epicenter of the Industrial Revolution, the UK, and to follow their aftershocks as they moved through the various centers that kept the rolling going. His choices were rational and made for an excellent flow. I was most impressed with the way Professor Allitt honestly disclosed his priors upfront, intellectually rigorous to move to conclusions only after having exposed us to arguments on all sides of an issue, and strikingly coherent in his defense of socio- and politico- economic views that so many of his peers in academia are now unwilling or unable to advocate. Lecture 36 is a masterful summation of his thesis. I would start this. It is a humble but proud defense of the net technological, economic, and social progress that the Industrial Revolution has brought. Then, as you go through the course, you will better appreciate how this progress was spawned by individual creativity and a zeal for meeting real needs, how it was usually fueled by free markets, but how it really took hold when it addressed relevant social, political, and economic trade-offs. (The technical glitch that had omitted Lecture 34 – and which some reviewers had noted -- has been corrected.)

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b********u
May 24, 2019

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j********u
March 29, 2019

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