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The Modern Political Tradition: Hobbes to Habermas

Deepen your understanding of politics in this course that reveals the remarkable evolution, impact, and legacy of modern political philosophy.

Watch First Lecture

36 Lectures

1
Image of Origins and Conflicts of Modern Politics
Origins and Conflicts of Modern Politics
0 of 34 min
2
Image of Ancient Republics, Empires, Fiefdoms
Ancient Republics, Empires, Fiefdoms
0 of 30 min
3
Image of Machiavelli’s New Order
Machiavelli’s New Order
0 of 29 min
4
Image of Hobbes, Natural Law, the Social Contract
Hobbes, Natural Law, the Social Contract
0 of 31 min
5
Image of Locke on Limited Government and Toleration
Locke on Limited Government and Toleration
0 of 32 min
6
Image of Rousseau’s Republican Community
Rousseau’s Republican Community
0 of 31 min
7
Image of Kant’s Ethics of Duty and Natural Rights
Kant’s Ethics of Duty and Natural Rights
0 of 30 min
8
Image of Smith and the Market Revolution
Smith and the Market Revolution
0 of 32 min
9
Image of Montesquieu and the American Founding
Montesquieu and the American Founding
0 of 31 min
10
Image of Debating the French Revolution
Debating the French Revolution
0 of 31 min
11
Image of Legacies of the Revolution—Right to Left
Legacies of the Revolution—Right to Left
0 of 32 min
12
Image of Nationalism and a People’s War
Nationalism and a People’s War
0 of 29 min
13
Image of Civil Society—Constant, Hegel, Tocqueville
Civil Society—Constant, Hegel, Tocqueville
0 of 32 min
14
Image of Mill on Liberty and Utility
Mill on Liberty and Utility
0 of 30 min
15
Image of Marx’s Critique of Capitalism
Marx’s Critique of Capitalism
0 of 31 min
16
Image of Modern vs. Traditional Society
Modern vs. Traditional Society
0 of 31 min
17
Image of Progressivism and New Liberalism
Progressivism and New Liberalism
0 of 29 min
18
Image of Fleeing Liberalism—Varieties of Socialism
Fleeing Liberalism—Varieties of Socialism
0 of 31 min
19
Image of Fleeing Liberalism—Fascism and Carl Schmitt
Fleeing Liberalism—Fascism and Carl Schmitt
0 of 31 min
20
Image of Totalitarianism and Total War
Totalitarianism and Total War
0 of 30 min
21
Image of Conservative or Neoliberal—Oakeshott, Hayek
Conservative or Neoliberal—Oakeshott, Hayek
0 of 30 min
22
Image of Reviving the Public Realm—Hannah Arendt
Reviving the Public Realm—Hannah Arendt
0 of 31 min
23
Image of Philosophy vs. Politics—Strauss and Friends
Philosophy vs. Politics—Strauss and Friends
0 of 29 min
24
Image of Marcuse and the New Left
Marcuse and the New Left
0 of 30 min
25
Image of Rawls’s A Theory of Justice
Rawls’s A Theory of Justice
0 of 31 min
26
Image of Ayn Rand, Robert Nozick, Libertarianism
Ayn Rand, Robert Nozick, Libertarianism
0 of 32 min
27
Image of What about Community?
What about Community?
0 of 32 min
28
Image of Walzer on Everything Money Shouldn’t Buy
Walzer on Everything Money Shouldn’t Buy
0 of 30 min
29
Image of Identity Politics—Feminism
Identity Politics—Feminism
0 of 29 min
30
Image of Identity Politics—Multiculturalism
Identity Politics—Multiculturalism
0 of 30 min
31
Image of The Politics of Nature—Environmentalism
The Politics of Nature—Environmentalism
0 of 30 min
32
Image of Postmodernism, Truth, and Power
Postmodernism, Truth, and Power
0 of 31 min
33
Image of Habermas—Democracy as Communication
Habermas—Democracy as Communication
0 of 31 min
34
Image of The End of History? Clash of Civilizations?
The End of History? Clash of Civilizations?
0 of 29 min
35
Image of Just Wars? The Problem of Dirty Hands
Just Wars? The Problem of Dirty Hands
0 of 31 min
36
Image of Why Political Philosophy Matters
Why Political Philosophy Matters
0 of 32 min

Reviews

d********m
July 17, 2019
Lawrence Cahoone’s “Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida” is brilliantly done. I wish this series of lectures existed when I was first dabbling in philosophy, because the clarity of the explanation of the philosophical ideas and general discussion is such that a high schooler of modest intelligence could understand the lectures. However, the sophistication of this course is such that, with years of academic training in philosophy and years of self-study, I have taken away a few nuggets from the course that I had not known before. Anyone interested in this lecture series should know that, while title claims that it goes from Descartes to Derrida, this was done for alliteration: the course actually covers many of the postmodern thinkers, as well as a responses to postmodernism. One aspect of the lecture series that I think any viewer will appreciate is that Cahoone understands and explains all philosophers and philosophies sympathetically and generously. In fact, I could not determine his philosophical leanings until I researched some of his papers and books. This level of non-dogmatic and unbiased presentation is very rare. Usually, philosophers can’t present an opposing philosopher’s ideas as the opposing philosopher would; moreover, they typically can’t wait to tell you what they think about any given issue. I will say that the viewer should be cautious on one philosophical presentation –that of Nietzsche and his work. It is clear to me that Cahoone did an honest job of presenting every philosopher, but I would maintain that he is guilty of a creative misunderstanding of Nietzsche’s work. Actually, the rationale behind the misunderstanding of Nietzsche’s thought is such that I’d like to know what the source for his understanding is. It could be that he didn’t read much of Nietzsche’s original work and got his Nietzsche from a professor during his education –or possibly even someone like Schopenhauer, which is a big mistake. At any rate, when watching the lecture on Nietzsche, I would definitely be careful about taking anything as a fact. As I said, the misunderstandings and misinterpretations are interesting enough that I was hoping to find their source, though I have not. Having read everything (including notebooks, etc.) that Nietzsche wrote, as well as many contemporary works on Nietzsche (e.g., by Kaufman, Robert C. Solomon, etc.), I hope I’m not being too presumptuous in thinking that it is Cahoone’s understanding of Nietzsche that is outside of the norm. Whatever their origin, Cahoone has interesting things to say. Overall, I recommend this book to anyone short the graduate level of philosophy, but even philosophy grad-level students will find items of interest in this course. I feel that everyone interested in philosophy should know the content that Cahoone presents in this course. I think the people who will get the most bang for their buck will be those who are outside of academic philosophy study, who are interested in getting their bearings within the subject.

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r********t
May 31, 2019
Professor Cahoone's Courses are among the best offered by the Teaching Company. Second time watching his lectures and really beginning to appreciate his unbelievable knowledge and teaching skills .

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p********m
May 9, 2019
Spellbinding! Professor Cahoone is a rockstar. The amount of knowledge he imparts and the level of mastery with which he wields it are staggering. This is perhaps the best course from among the many I've watched on here.

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