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The Myths of Nutrition and Fitness

Explore in great depths the major myths, lies, and half-truths related to key components of fitness and nutrition.
The Myths of Nutrition and Fitness is rated 3.8 out of 5 by 39.
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Rated 3 out of 5 by from for professional and serious amateurs only The Professor aimed his discussion at professional and very serious amateur athletes. The course material had only accidental benefit for casual athletes.
Date published: 2023-08-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sage Advice Really did not expect a lot from this 2011 course, as the topic is constantly over-published. Goodman has two advantages: he appears to be quite active physically and his medical work is not locked into a tiny subspecialty. In my prior experience as a physician, this latter is extremely important. While subspecialists perform amazingly well in their area, generalists are much better at understanding the "whole person" and interacting body systems. Goodman's advice and cautions separate the wheat from the chaff and consider the "whole person". Goodman begins lecture 1 (L1) with the VERY appropriate caution that "…there's a lot in this field of nutrition and fitness that changes every single day." Why? The Great Course "Unexpected Economics" by Taylor notes (L18) "universal opinion…was often the result of 2 or 3 people who analyzed (a) subject". This is rampant in medicine: when I was an intern, a specialty society decided that circumcisions were bad. This went on for about 2 years and then got reversed much to the chagrin of the now older boys. Hardly the only bad call made "on high": Goodman, for example, correctly replaces the "food pyramid" with "the healthy plate rule". He also gives a lot of nice "general" advice. For those without personal trainers, he suggests (L1) pre-workout meals as "low in fat, moderate in protein, and highest in complex carbs, suggesting things like avocadoes or hard cheese on whole grin crackers, eggs with whole wheat toast, turkey, hummus or other nut butters…yogurt, fat free milk, and dried fruit." He says that the pre-activity load should be about 200 calories. This is a "fist sized volume" eaten over 20 minutes to avoid bloating while providing satiety…rapid eating causes chronic stomach overstretching, defeating satiety and inviting obesity. Specifics continue: hard activities over 1 hour require 50 carb calories per hour and (L2) a quart and a half of water/sports drink 2-3 hours prior to heavy exertion. Working outside in sweltering heat, I appreciated the way (L2) he correlated water weight loss with replacement: After exercise the (mostly water) weight loss is replaced with 150% of its WEIGHT in water/electrolyte solutions and then you should also recheck your weight. The examples from his rowing days were helpful as were his cautions about alcohol-related dehydration and insensible water loss at altitude (L6 adds that going from 6000 to 10,000 feet doubles triples your water loss). L3's "A pound of …fat (is) about 4000 calories." but 30 minutes of exercise 3x a week only burns 800 calories. It is a reason to PAY ATTENTION to the rest of the lecture. Doing the calculations for L4's limitations on protein intake (to avoid overwhelming liver capacity, hyperaminoacidemia, hyperammonemia, diarrhea, calcium bone loss, etc.) may have a wonderful effect on lowering your meat budget. After calculating my own by the various methods, he suggested, I lowered my grocery bill meat costs significantly! He comments on an odd effect of creatine that messes up statin dosing, takes to task "energy drinks" and notes that Quercetin, if helpful, is found in apple skins, berries, red win, black tea, and some leafy vegetables. His L5 on excessive dieting seems less applicable today when obesity is celebrated in the media. However, "excessive” has taken a new form as "addiction to exercise" - he covers its difficulties nicely. L6 covers extreme sports and includes specifics about glycogen storage and carb loading that were nicely reasoned. His comments on why snow won't work for hydration; high carb water weight gain, GI bloating, and diarrhea, the rationale behind scaling back training prior to events; and the MRI cardiac fibrosis found in lifelong extreme athletes were all interesting. CONCLUSION: Loved L2's "bottled water costs more than gasoline". The 93-page guidebook for this 6-lecture course starts with a summary for the lecture followed by the actual lecture transcript…Nice! Finally, please note that I am RETIRED physician and nothing I've said here is medical advice.
Date published: 2022-10-04
Rated 1 out of 5 by from No balanced delivery here, just no no no One examples was supplements section. Supplements are junk he says, then he adjusts but saying "some pregnant women and kids might need something" - Seriously? Where is reality here? what about all the people with Vitamin D deficiency just for starters. No way, you'll get no good info here.
Date published: 2022-01-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great information that cuts through the advertisin I’ve been involved with supplements and physical training for many years. These courses cut through the advertising misinformation and let you know what is true out there. Very clear and concise lectures. I recommend this course to anyone looking to understand and follow a good food(diet) plan.
Date published: 2021-06-14
Rated 1 out of 5 by from No valuable information. Just bland opinion. Not worth the time or money. The speaker kept saying we have to focus on the science and not anecdotes but then would elaborate on a single study which is the same thing. That is one of many weaknesses of this course. I contacted customer service for a refund and did not get a response.
Date published: 2019-12-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good presentation. Spoke at just the right pace, however, I was disappointed that so much of the text was aimed at 'serious' athletes, rather than ordinary folks who strive to get/stay in shape.
Date published: 2019-08-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Practical advice without the hipe. Good speaker who relies on science to support sound advice about how to eat and move.
Date published: 2019-04-21
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Professor interesting, informative. I have just started the first lesson and find the information useful and informative. Would review again once course completed.
Date published: 2018-02-15
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Overview

Explore in great depths the major myths, lies, and half-truths related to key components of fitness and nutrition in The Myths of Nutrition and Fitness. In this accessible six-lecture course by Dr. Anthony A. Goodman, you'll examine the pros and cons of training and eating programs, learn strategies to help you discern the truth behind popular myths, discover new ways to be healthy and physically active, and more.

About

Anthony A. Goodman

It is the greatest gift to be able to explore the ever-changing outer edges of science and share them with my students.

INSTITUTION

Montana State University

Dr. Anthony A. Goodman is Adjunct Professor of Medicine at Montana State University and Affiliate Professor in the Department of Biological Structure at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He earned his B.A. from Harvard College and his M.D. from Cornell Medical College and trained as a surgical intern and resident at the University of Michigan Medical Center in Ann Arbor. He completed his surgical training and served as chief resident at the Harvard Surgical Service of Boston City Hospital, the New England Deaconess Hospital, the Lahey Clinic, and Cambridge City Hospital. For 20 years, Dr. Goodman worked as a general surgeon in south Florida and served as Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery at the University of Miami School of Medicine. In addition, he served as a surgeon with the U.S. Army Medical Corps and on the hospital ship for Project HOPE. He was also Visiting Professor of Surgery at the Christchurch, New Zealand, Clinical School of Medicine. Founder of the Broward Surgical Society, Dr. Goodman is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a Diplomate of the National Board of Medical Examiners and the American Board of Surgery.

By This Professor

Understanding the Human Body: An Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology, 2nd Edition
854
The Myths of Nutrition and Fitness
854
Lifelong Health: Achieving Optimum Well-Being at Any Age
854
The Myths of Nutrition and Fitness

Trailer

Fueling Up for Fitness Routines

01: Fueling Up for Fitness Routines

In this first engaging lecture, Dr. Goodman focuses on what specific foods you should eat to fuel your individual fitness program. Which body signals can help you determine the nutrition and fitness regimen that best fits your individual needs? When should you be skeptical of a particular diet’s claims? What foods should you eat before, during, and after exercises—and how much?

32 min
Hydration for an Active Life

02: Hydration for an Active Life

Explore popular myths about hydration and fitness. These include, thirst is a poor indication of dehydration; athletes should avoid drinking caffeine because of its diuretic qualities; there’s no such thing as water toxicity; and bottled water is the purest, safest, and best-tasting source of water available. Along the way, you’ll learn the right ways to keep your body hydrated while you exercise.

32 min
The Skinny on Exercise and Weight Loss

03: The Skinny on Exercise and Weight Loss

Take a closer look at some popular and prevalent myths related to dieting, exercising, and weight loss. Your focus here is on a specific group of weight-loss myths, including the myth that you can control your weight by cutting fat, protein, or carbohydrates out of your diet, and that you can reduce fat selectively on your body by exercising specific areas prone to increased fat.

30 min
Some Facts about Vitamins and Supplements

04: Some Facts about Vitamins and Supplements

Dr. Goodman, with his characteristic candor and insight, debunks myths about common and popular vitamins and dietary supplements—most of which you can find on the shelves of your local supermarkets and health food stores. Among myths you investigate in this lecture are multivitamins and their ability to maintain health, creatine and quercetin and their ability to enhance your physical performance, and sports and energy drinks and their effectiveness.

32 min
Can You Get Too Much of a Good Thing?

05: Can You Get Too Much of a Good Thing?

If a little diet and exercise is good for you, then more must always be better for you, right? Explore the dangers hidden in this enduring myth by taking a closer look at what happens when we go to extremes while dieting and exercising. Topics you’ll examine in this lecture include eating disorders, exercise addictions, and ways to recognize when your body needs to rest.

31 min
Going to Extremes-The Smart Way

06: Going to Extremes-The Smart Way

Focus on debates related to extreme athletic events such as high-altitude mountain climbing and marathon running. As you delve into the half-truths and real scientific facts behind environmental adaptation, carbohydrate loading, and much more, you’ll get pointed advice on how to handle the extremes of exercise and endurance through preparation and the moderate intake of carbohydrates under the supervision of a sports medicine expert.

33 min