You updated your password.

Reset Password

Enter the email address you used to create your account. We will email you instructions on how to reset your password.

Forgot Your Email Address? Contact Us

Reset Your Password

SHOW
SHOW

12 Revolutionary Discoveries That Could Change Everything

Investigate the world around us with the mind of a scientist in 12 compelling lectures on recent scientific discoveries.
872
12 Revolutionary Discoveries That Could Change Everything is rated 2.7 out of 5 by 13.
  • y_2024, m_7, d_18, h_4
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvrr, vn_bulk_3.0.42
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_0, tr_13
  • loc_en_CA, sid_10520, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=SUBMISSION_TIME, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_teachco
  • bvseo_sdk, p_sdk, 3.2.1
  • CLOUD, getAggregateRating, 7.34ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Insomnia Cure! Semi interesting topics but presenter sitting, monotonic and uninteresting-- eyes fixed on teleprompter.
Date published: 2024-05-08
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Poor Production Quality I only watched one and a half of these lectures. It was more a reading of articles than a presentation by an expert in each field. Considering the expertise and enthusiasm of the best Wondrium profs, it’s a real head scratcher why they would present with just a reader. Even on a commercial TV science magazine presentations they interview the research scientists themselves.
Date published: 2024-05-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Enjoyable! I like this short course which I do understand some viewers are taken aback by its presentation. It is produced in "magazine-style" as a documentary vignettes instead as an academic course, I believe bcos episodes are based on Scientefic American articles. I'd rather enjoy the production and its unique style - thanks!
Date published: 2024-04-05
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Most disappointing course out of 100 This is the most disappointing course I have endured in 20 years of being a Teaching Company/Great Courses super fan. The "lecture " messenger RNA was 5 minutes long and was an advertisement for what it could do but provided no real information. Only the sample lecture on how exercise does not cause weight loss was interesting. The course was devoid of content and boring. I am going to request my first refund.
Date published: 2024-04-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Interesting Diverse Topics I have seen 2 so far. Very informative. I like there are a variety of topics. As a sewist, I really liked the textile video. It's interesting to see how prominent fabric became an industry and then it's movement into the industrialization of it. I would have liked to have seen more objects and other cultures, but she did have to squeeze a lot of information in a small timeframe. She has a great voice and easy to listen to. I can't wait to continue watching the rest of them.
Date published: 2024-03-19
Rated 1 out of 5 by from The worst Wondrium course ever ! Structureless & superficial blathering by a zombie Scientific American s brand just took a bath in my books
Date published: 2024-03-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Okay Sometimes I root for the underdog. As of this writing, the rating is 2.7, so I decided to take a look. The first six lectures were old news to me; I'd seen some of these years ago on PBS. Take Lecture 5: The Quantum Nature of Bird Migration, none of the theories were new. The newest information presented was ten years old. It was revolutionary in its day but not now. The last six, however, saved this from a lower rating. Perhaps it was because I had a great deal of familiarity with the subjects. For instance, while studying psychology in the 1970's, the transmission of the effects of a parent's trauma on their unborn child had been theorized but was far from proven. Now, with modern technology, it has progressed from a theory to a fact. My research made a small contribution to the final formulation of safe mRNA therapy; the lecture was only six minutes in length--disappointing. The final lecture, "Why Black Holes Turn Inside Out" was excellent, as were the graphics. As for Dr. Helmuth, her voice was pleasant and well-modulated. However, in the obviously unnatural posture for a lecturer (sitting), her body was ridged and did not move, save for facial movements. This is not her fault. I have heard her lecture in person and the constraints of the chair had an adverse effect on an otherwise excellent speaker. All things considered, I would rate the course 3.5; not having that option, I rounded it to 4. Would I recommend this course? Sadly, I must say no. However, for one in High School, it may indeed hold some interest, in which case, I'd recommend it.
Date published: 2024-02-27
Rated 1 out of 5 by from TTS-like reading Oh man. I usually love Wondrium material - but this was a hard one to get through. There was a lot of critical information left out of some of these topics. It was a monotone presentation. The speaker barely moved except for the eyes which were so obviously following a prompter that it was actually distracting. I'm not sure how half of these would ever "change everything". I'm not sure why this was even made into a video. I had a hard time with this one. SciAm has been going downhill for a while; so I guess you'd need a cherry on top.
Date published: 2024-02-22
  • y_2024, m_7, d_18, h_4
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvrr, vn_bulk_3.0.42
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_0, tr_13
  • loc_en_CA, sid_10520, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=SUBMISSION_TIME, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_teachco
  • bvseo_sdk, p_sdk, 3.2.1
  • CLOUD, getReviews, 5.17ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT

Overview

Dig into some of the most fascinating and important scientific advancements in recent years. Unexpected, consequential, and often counterintuitive, 12 Revolutionary Discoveries That Could Change Everything offers an inspiring introduction to science in the 21st century.

About

Laura Helmuth

I hope you’ll join me on this fascinating tour of what science has discovered.

INSTITUTION

Scientific American

Laura Helmuth is the editor in chief of Scientific American. She earned a PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience from the University of California, Berkeley, and a graduate certificate in Science Communication from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She has served in various editorial positions, including for The Washington Post, Smithsonian magazine, and Science. She is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Standing Committee on Advancing Science Communication and was previously president of the National Association of Science Writers.

By This Expert

Examining the Big Questions of Time
853
Understanding Your Inner Genius
854
12 Revolutionary Discoveries That Could Change Everything
854
12 Revolutionary Discoveries That Could Change Everything

Trailer

Why the Sea Can Glow the Color of Milk

01: Why the Sea Can Glow the Color of Milk

The course opens on the sea at night, where, for generations, sailors have encountered the eerie phenomenon of bioluminescence. Discover how advances in satellite technology shifted our understanding of “milky seas” from a quasi-mythical encounter to a biological fact.

20 min
The True Colors of Dinosaurs

02: The True Colors of Dinosaurs

For decades, scientists assumed pigments rarely survived the fossilization process, so dinosaur reconstructions were left to artists’ and moviemakers’ imaginations. Thanks to a recent discovery under an electron microscope, scientists have found a way to bring dinosaur bones into modern Technicolor glory.

20 min
How Textiles Gave Viking Women Power

03: How Textiles Gave Viking Women Power

Until recently, our understanding of Viking culture has been woefully incomplete. Because early archaeologists focused on tools of hunting and war, women received little attention. Here, trace the work of several groundbreaking archaeologists and their discoveries around textiles—and the powerful women who made them.

25 min
New Truths about Lichens

04: New Truths about Lichens

Shift your attention to modern-day British Columbia to meet Trevor Goward, one of the world’s experts on lichens. Despite lacking formal credentials, Goward is a naturalist in the tradition of Darwin, and his inquiry into the nature of lichens has rocked the world of biology in recent years.

23 min
The Quantum Nature of Bird Migration

05: The Quantum Nature of Bird Migration

We’re all familiar with the seasonal migration of birds, but how do they find their way? How do they know which way is south or north? Delve into the astonishing world of quantum effects and magnetic fields to understand the newly discovered mechanisms of bird navigation.

20 min
Unexpected Smashups in the Solar System

06: Unexpected Smashups in the Solar System

In the old view of the solar system’s creation, a dance of particles and gases gradually coalesced. Thanks to the study of meteorites and radioactive metals, evidence now shows the solar system formed much quicker than anyone understood, with dynamic planetary bodies slamming together. Rethink your view of the cosmos in this breathtaking lecture.

18 min
Why Exercise Doesn’t Help You Lose Weight

07: Why Exercise Doesn’t Help You Lose Weight

An adage of public health states that “you can’t outrun a bad diet.” Now, thanks to anthropological research into the calories humans burn by engaging in various physical activities, scientists see more clearly than ever that exercise—while hugely beneficial—has little impact on weight loss. Learn the latest on human physiology here.

18 min
How Parents’ Trauma Affects Future Children

08: How Parents’ Trauma Affects Future Children

Is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) inheritable? If you’re exposed to trauma, can you pass that along to your children? In this lecture, researchers study traumas ranging from the Holocaust to 9/11 and examine cortisol levels in children. It turns out: We can feel environmental stress in our genes.

23 min
The Breakthrough in Messenger RNA Therapies

09: The Breakthrough in Messenger RNA Therapies

In the wake of the global coronavirus pandemic, citizens around the world learned about messenger RNA therapies—specifically, the COVID-19 vaccine. But this technology has been around for years and has a wealth of untapped potential. Discover the future of medicine in this information-rich lecture.

6 min
You Really Can Learn in Your Sleep

10: You Really Can Learn in Your Sleep

Everyone knows we learn better when we’re well rested, but is it possible to learn while we’re resting? With brain imaging technology, memory reactivation techniques, and other scientific processes, scientists are gaining an entirely new perspective on self-improvement—making possible what once seemed like science fiction.

12 min
How Your Brain Constructs the World

11: How Your Brain Constructs the World

In this mind-bending lecture, you’ll investigate how the brain maps the world, creating the experience of consciousness. You’ll think like a neural scientist as you reflect on the brain’s relationship to the world, the blank slate theory of experience, and how brains learn through self-organization.

20 min
Why Black Holes Turn Inside Out

12: Why Black Holes Turn Inside Out

Black holes are some of the most intriguing objects in the universe, lighting up the imagination of the public and confounding scientists for decades. After a survey of quantum theory and black holes, dive into the latest research involving spacetime, event horizons, wormholes, and much more.

21 min